tissue fluid


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in·ter·sti·tial flu·id

the fluid in spaces between the tissue cells, constituting about 16% of the weight of the body; closely similar in composition to lymph.
Synonym(s): tissue fluid
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tissue fluid

The fluid occupying the spaces between body cells by way of which oxygen, carbon dioxide and dissolved substances are passed to and from the cells. Also known as interstitial fluid.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

tissue fluid

the intercellular fluid forming the internal environment immediately surrounding cells. It is formed from blood by a process of ULTRAFILTRATION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This approximation can be considered by assuming that the loss in diffusible gas tension by diffusion to the growing gas bubble (sink) can be replaced by perfusion from blood to tissue fluid. The validity of this approximation may not hold during very rapid changes in ambient pressure or breathing gas.
22 and diagnosed with acute kidney injury secondary to interstitial nephritis (an inflammation of the tissue fluid between kidney tubules) and tracheo-esophageal fistula (an abnormal connection between the trachea and the esophagus).
In the stroma tissue fluid has increased greatly causing oedema.
ISL stage 1 This represents the early onset of the condition where there is accumulation of tissue fluid that subsides with elevation.
For example, soft tissue fluid retention, or extravasation, is a common problem during arthroscopy.
It can be likened to a waste disposal system, taking tissue fluid, bacteria, proteins and waste products away.
Are you aware of lipids being released in tissue fluid as the result of massaging or squeezing a finger during sample collection?
The literature contains reports of diffusion of aluminum ions, which can reach toxic levels in tissue fluid and adjacent bone as the cement hardens.
The fluid is tissue fluid, so it can't spread the reaction to other areas of the child or to another person.
These thin "bubbles" are caused by tissue fluid leaking into the burnt area just beneath the skin's surface.
Always wipe away the first drop of blood, which may be contaminated with tissue fluid or debris (sloughing skin).[7] Do not squeeze the finger or heel too tightly.
The mite is living on the epidermal surface of auditory canal without burrowing into tissue and feeds on tissue fluids and debris (Maazi et al., 2010).