tissue engineering


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tissue engineering

The manufacturing of functioning organs for implantation and use inside the body.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
"This is the first clinical application of tissue engineered grafts that I know of, and the use of bone marrow cells in human vascular tissue engineering is also a first," he said in an interview.
The laboratory of John Davies, FCIC, is rich with innovations related to bone tissue engineering. Davies has created a novel biodegradable scaffold in collaboration with our laboratory.
Polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds such as these can cause cells to grow into and speed the beginnings of new tissues and organs, thereby holding the promise to repair functionality destroyed by injury, disease, and aging.
"This agreement is an important step in the development of a technology that could, potentially, transform dentistry and the industries related to it," said Christopher Somogyi, chairman and chief executive officer of Dentigenix, an early stage company dedicated to bringing the advances of tissue engineering and regeneration to dentistry and craniofacial restoration.
Scientists experimenting with this technique, called tissue engineering, say one day it may be used to replace other body parts that can't grow back on their own -- like ears, livers, and heart valves.
M2 PRESSWIRE-July 30, 2019-: Tissue Engineering Market To Be Driven By Growing Necessity Of Enhanced Technology In The Pharmaceuticals And Healthcare Sector Till 2025 | Million Insights
This field, known as tissue engineering, has shown great promise in potentially alleviating the organ shortage in the future.
M2 PRESSWIRE-August 22, 2019-: Tissue Engineering Market Size is Set to Reach USD 53,424.00 Million By 2024, Industry Overview, Demand Insight, Technology Trends, Top Leaders, Regional Analysis
Tissue engineering, as an established and growing interdisciplinary field comprising different specialties, such as medicine, materials science, cell biology, genomics and chemical engineering, aims to develop biological substitutes to restore, maintain or improve tissue function, thus offering patients the chance to regain normal functionality in their body.
Tissue engineering employs a biocompatible scaffold, with or without cells, to restore or establish normal function in tissues (1).
Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have typically matured from benchtop ideas to commercially applicable products in the clinic (1).