tissue culture

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culture

 [kul´cher]
1. the propagation of microorganisms or of living tissue cells in special media conducive to their growth.
2. to induce such propagation.
3. the product of such propagation.
4. the shared values, beliefs, and practices of a particular group of people, which are transmitted from one generation to the next and are identified as patterns that guide the thinking and action of the group members. adj., adj cul´tural.
cell culture the maintenance or growth of animal cells in vitro, or a culture of such cells.
blood culture microbiologic examination of a blood sample to check for presence of microorganisms.
continuous flow culture the cultivation of bacteria in a continuous flow of fresh medium to maintain bacterial growth in logarithmic phase.
enrichment culture one grown on a medium, usually liquid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a given type of organism.
hanging-drop culture a culture in which the material to be cultivated is inoculated into a drop of fluid attached to a coverglass inverted over a hollow slide.
primary culture a cell or tissue culture made by direct transfer from a natural source to an artificial medium.
selective culture one grown on a medium, usually solid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a single species of microorganism. It may also include substances that inhibit the growth of other species.
shake culture a culture made by inoculating warm liquid agar culture medium in a tube and shaking to distribute contents evenly. Incubation of the resolidified culture allows the development of separated colonies; especially adaptable to obligate anaerobes.
slant culture one made on the surface of solidified medium in a tube which has been tilted to provide a greater surface area for growth.
culture-specific syndrome folk illnesses that are unique to a particular culture or geographical area. Each illness has a cluster of symptoms, signs, and behavioral changes that are recognized by members of the culture; usually, they also have a range of symbolic meanings and culturally agreed-upon treatments. Anorexia nervosa and Type A behavior pattern are examples of syndromes specific to industrialized cultures.
stab culture a culture into which the organisms are introduced by thrusting a needle deep into the medium.
streak culture a culture in which the surface of a solid medium is inoculated by drawing across it, in a zig-zag fashion, a wire inoculating loop carrying the inoculum.
suspension culture a culture in which cells multiply while suspended in a suitable medium.
tissue culture the maintaining or growing of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and function.
type culture a culture of a species of microorganism usually maintained in a central collection of type cultures.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tis·sue cul·ture

the maintenance of live tissue after removal from the body, by placing in a vessel with a sterile nutritive medium.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tissue culture

n.
1. The technique or process of maintaining or cultivating cells or tissues derived from a living organism in a culture medium.
2. A culture of cells or tissue grown by this technique or process.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tis·sue cul·ture

(tish'ū kŭl'chŭr)
The maintenance of live tissue after removal from the body, by placing in a vessel with a sterile nutritive medium.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tissue culture

The artificial growth of sheets of human tissue in the laboratory. Tumour cells are readily cultured and some appear to be immortal. These are widely used for laboratory purposes. Normal skin cells (keratinocytes) can be cultured and used for grafting in the same person. Three-layered arteries have been grown as have sheets of urethral endothelium for purposes of urethral reconstitution in hypospadias. It has even been possible to grow a new ear around a mould of polymer mesh.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

tissue culture

a technique in which individual cells grow and divide in a bath of sterile, nutritive fluid which often contains hormones and growth substances. The method is used extensively in biological laboratories, for example in cancer research (see HELA CELLS), plant breeding and routine analysis of chromosome KARYOTYPES. see AMNIOCENTESIS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Bilono III officiated the blessing of the CSet Tissue Culture Laboratory, as well as the Food Processing Facility of PCA-ARC.
Gallego, "Improving knowledge of plant tissue culture and media formulation by neurofuzzy logic: A practical case of data mining using apricot databases," Journal of Plant Physiology, vol.
Large-scale mass propagation of breadfruit is possible using plant tissue culture techniques with the capacity of producing a large number of disease-free and true to type plantlets in a short period of time (Rani and Raina, 2000).
insensitive plants from tissue cultures of oats {Avena sativa) susceptible to Helminthosporium victoriae.
Skoog did work in plants hormones and was interested in plant tissue culture in general, Murashige was the graduate student under Skoog and both worked on a basic media for a number of plants, especially tropical house plants later on.
Plant tissue culture has been used to produce ginseng at a commercial scale and is used to manufacture commercial quantities of anti-cancer agents.
The best water for the health of living tissues is tissue-culture-grade water, used to grow live tissue cultures in laboratory research, says a spokesman.
During the cloning process, Genfor harvests immature seeds then generates tissue cultures from them, creating the source of an infinite number of future plants.
In the new study, researchers led by Antonis Makrigiannakis of the University of Crete in Greece examined human trophoblast cells isolated in tissue cultures. They found that these embryonic cells produce CRH.
While working with tomato tissue cultures, ARS biologist Betty K.
body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids; (2) Any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human; and (3) HIV-containing cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures, and HIV- or HBV-containing culture medium or other solutions; and blood, organs, or other tissues from experimental animals infected with HIV or HBV.