tire

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tire

(tīr) [AS. teorian, to tire]
1. To become fatigued.
2. To exhaust or fatigue.
References in periodicals archive ?
She has tirelessly conducted personal, promotional efforts to draw new members to the ADAA and has served her state and local components consistently and over long periods of time.
Former Progressive Managing Editor Sam Day worked tirelessly for Vanunu's release for many years.
Pulec assumed the role of editor-in-chief of ENT JOURNAL in September 1992 until his death, he worked tirelessly to help us produce the most practical, up-to-date, scientifically and clinically relevant journal possible for our readers.
Wilchins should not mischaracterize the efforts of the hundreds of transgender activists and allies who have worked tirelessly to ensure that both gender identity and expression are protected.
The new president of Morris Brown College, a 103-year-old historically black college in Atlanta, is tirelessly raising money to not only keep the doors open, but to help re-establish accreditation with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
Collier worked tirelessly as a contributor and Web master for the Puget Sound Chapter's Web site.
5 billion in total issues, worked tirelessly with New York Sen.
Here are some examples of how young people pitched in to help the rescue workers who are toiling tirelessly at the sites of destruction:
Supported by humanity's quest for eternal youth and immortality, researchers tirelessly search for links to mortality and morbidity.
She has worked tirelessly and effectively to advance the mission, principle, and purposes of the Institute and to improve tax administration for the common benefit of taxpayers and government.
CHICAGO--From fighting the B-1 bomber in the 1970s to calling for the cancellation of developing countries' foreign debt during the year 2000, the 8th Day Center for Justice in Chicago has worked tirelessly for peace and justice on dozens of fronts for a quarter of a century.
The oddity of a lone wave cruising tirelessly and undiminished across a body of water has fascinated scientists since the phenomenon was first observed in the 1830s.