tincture

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tincture

 [tingk´chur]
an alcoholic or hydroalcoholic solution prepared from vegetable drugs or chemical substances.
compound benzoin tincture a mixture of benzoin and several other ingredients in alcohol, used as a topical skin protectant.
iodine tincture a preparation of iodine and sodium iodide in diluted alcohol, used as a topical antiinfective.

tinc·ture

(tingk'chūr),
An alcoholic or hydroalcoholic solution prepared from vegetable materials or from chemical substances; most tinctures are prepared by percolation or by maceration. The proportions of drug represented in the different tinctures are not uniform, but vary according to the established standards for each. Tinctures of potent drugs essentially represent the activity of 10 g of the drug in each 100 mL of tincture, the potency being adjusted after assay; most other tinctures represent 20 g of drug in each 100 mL of tincture. Compound tinctures are made according to long-established formulas.
Synonym(s): tinctura

tincture

/tinc·ture/ (tingk´chur) an alcoholic or hydroalcoholic solution prepared from vegetable materials or chemical substances.
iodine tincture  a preparation of iodine and sodium iodide in diluted alcohol, used as a topical antiinfective.

tincture

(tĭngk′chər)
n.
An alcohol solution of a nonvolatile medicine: tincture of iodine.

tincture

a plant extract made by soaking herbs in a liquid (such as water, alcohol, vinegar, or glycerine) for a specified length of time, then straining and discarding the plant material. The remaining liquid is used therapeutically. Tinctures typically are made at a concentration of 1:5 to 1:10.

tincture (tinct.)

[tingk′chər]
a substance in a solution that is dissolved in alcohol.

tincture

Herbal medicine
An ethanol-based extract that contains an herb’s essence, which is commonly mixed with water in a 50:50 ratio; tinctures have the advantage over other herbal preparations of a long shelf-life.

Pharmacology
A medicinal preparation, often of herbal origin, in which the ground substrate (e.g., bark, root, nuts or seeds) is soaked in alcohol to extract oils or other substances of interest.

tincture

Pharmacology A medicinal preparation, often of herbal origin in which the ground substrate–eg, bark, root, nuts, or seeds is soaked in alcohol to extract oils or other substances of interest.

tinc·ture

(tinct.) (tingk'shŭr)
An alcoholic or hydroalcoholic solution prepared from vegetable materials or from chemical substances.

tincture

An alcoholic solution of a drug.

Tincture

An alcoholic solution of a chemical or drug.
Mentioned in: Ipecac

tincture

chemical substance (in mg) dissolved in alcoholic solution (in mL), in a ratio of 10mg/100mL or 20mg/100mL

tincture (tingˑ·chr),

n alcohol extract of herbs or other substances.

tinc·ture

(Tr) (tingk'shŭr)
An alcoholic or hydroalcoholic solution prepared from vegetable materials or chemical substances.

tincture (tink´chur),

n an alcoholic, hydroalcoholic, or ethereal solution of a drug.

tincture

an alcoholic or hydroalcoholic solution prepared from an animal or vegetable drug or a chemical substance.

benzoin tincture, compound
a mixture of benzoin, aloes, storax and tolu balsam in alcohol; used as a topical protectant.
iodine tincture
a mixture of iodine and sodium iodide in a menstruum of alcohol and water; used as an anti-infective for the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
At last we have professionally manufactured fresh plant tinctures available to us in Australia.
If you're looking for an ideal way to store marijuana-based tinctures that is both legal and effective, MMC Depots products are a great choice.
You may want to dilute this tincture with a little water for an herbal wash, or add some of it to your favorite face cream.
The effects of the tinctures were measured against an alcohol control - proving their antibacterial action was not simply due to the sterilizing effect of the alcohol they are prepared in.
Rosemary Gladstar, a well-known herbalist, educator, author, and dog lover in East Barre, Vermont, values raw organic apple cider vinegar for its use in herbal tinctures.
In comparison with teas and syrups, tinctures also have a number of indisputable advantages, because many biologically active substances of plants do not dissolve in water.
The tincture is sold via the Duchy website, in selected Boots stores and in Waitrose.
Low Dog recommends all patients taking herbal medicines as tinctures purchase a milliliter dispenser at a pharmacy.
Infusions, compresses and decoctions should be used within a day of making, while tinctures and pills can be stored for up to two years, and infused oils, creams and ointments for several months.
He combines his troubleshooting skills with herbalism - the naturopathic element of his work - offering individually-prepared herb tinctures to clients after an iridology consultation.