belt

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belt

 [belt]
1. a strip of leather, canvas, or webbing that is worn around the waist.
2. to restrict by placing a circular binding around an area.

belt

Drug slang
A regional term referring to the jolting effects of an abuse substance when it takes effect.

Epidemiology
A popular term for any broad geographical region with an increased incidence of a particular disease.

Occupational medicine
A wide leather or heavy-duty cloth strap worn around the waist to support muscles when lifting.
 
Public health
See Seat belt.
 
Sports medicine
See Weight belt.

belt

Epidemiology A popular term for any broad geographical region with an ↑ incidence of a particular disease. See AIDS belt, Asian esophageal cancer belt, Cancer seat, Goiter belt, Lymphoma belt, Stroke belt Public health See Seat belt.
References in periodicals archive ?
But we ask them to exercise selfrestraint, to recognise it is wrong to accept huge bonuses when customers are tightening belts to simply make ends meet.
This week the Nationwide marked confidence down, the British Retail Consortium warned high street sales growth is slowing, the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply found service sector growth slowing, and the CBI cautioned consumers were tightening belts.
Everyone in the country is tightening belts, and it's high time this budget of pounds 9.
A Taxpayers' Alliance spokesman said: "This is a shockingly large amount of money to spend purely on cars, especially given all the Government's rhetoric about tightening belts and cutting down on pollution.
Ms Armstrong said: 'Coming after six years of tightening belts in exchange for empty promises of future job security, strong feelings were expressed that the workforce had given much, but were being rewarded with little.
Stores blamed families tightening belts after a series of price rises.
NEW Telewest boss Charles Burdick said yesterday he'd be tightening belts further this year.
The column inches predicting the next crash build up negative sentiment to such an extent that even those with no interest in the financial world suddenly become experts and go round telling everybody it is time for tightening belts.