snake

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Related to tiger snake: Eastern Tiger Snake, Black tiger snake

snake

 [snāk]
any of many limbless reptiles; numerous species have venomous bites. See also snakebite.
coral snake any of various venomous pit vipers of the genera Micrurus and Micruroides; called also harlequin snake.
harlequin snake coral snake.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

snake

(snāk),
An elongated, limbless, scaly reptile of the suborder Ophidia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

snake

(snāk)
n.
Any of numerous scaly, legless, sometimes venomous squamate reptiles of the suborder Serpentes (or Ophidia), having a long, tapering, cylindrical body and flexible jaws.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

snake

Trivial name for limbless members of suborder Ophidia, of medical interest, primarily because snakes have poisonous venom containing hemotoxins and/or neurotoxins; venomous North American snakes belong to either the viper family Crotilidae–rattlesnake, copperhead, water moccasin, or to Elapidae, coral snakes, related to cobras and kraits–India, Southeast Asia, and mambas, brown, black, tiger snakes of Australia; others–eg, constrictors encircle prey and asphyxiate; pet snakes are associated with infections: Aeromonas hydrophila, Edwardsiella tarda, E coli, mesocestoidiasis, Morganella morganii, Mycobacterium ulcerans, Ophionyssus natricis infestation, pentastosomiasis, Proteus vulgaris, Providencia spp, Q fever, salmonellosis, sparganosis. See Sea snake Vox populi A derogatory term for a ne'er-do-well–eg, lawyer, ex-spouse, etc.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nationwide, the most common species responsible for snake bites in small animals are the eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis), western brown snake (Pseudonaja nuchalis), tiger snakes (Notechis scutatus), and red-bellied black snakes (Pseudechis porphyriacus) [71-76].
We present two patients who were bitten by a common tiger snake (N.
In conclusion, we present two cases of thrombotic microangiopathy associated with tiger snake envenomation.
The cases presented here are the first two cases describing thrombotic microangiopathy following envenomation with tiger snakes (N.
Tests disclosed that weight for weight it was almost as lethal as the mainland tiger snake, with the venom strongly neurotoxic and coagulant.
The internal investigation revealed that at the time of Edmonds' admission only one ampoule of tiger snake antivenene had been available, and the single ampoule of polyvalent antivenene had been withheld from use.
During the decade from 1985 to 1995 tiger snakes accounted for 70 per cent of all snakebite fatalities.
About 50% of Tiger snake bites result in significant envenoming and prior to antivenom therapy there was a mortality of 45% (1).
We were interested in the clinical features and antivenom use in patients with significant Tiger snake envenoming.
there was a positive Commonwealth Serum Laboratories Venom Detection kit (VDk) result to Tiger snake or if not, reversal of envenoming with Tiger snake antivenom.
Living with Tiger snakes: An example of curriculum integration.
Dr Michael Guinea, Charles Darwin University honorary fellow, told ABC News sea snakes are "equally poisonous if not more poisonous as things such as our tiger snakes and western brown [snakes]".