tiger

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TIGER

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tiger

the large, 3 ft (1 m) high, 10 ft (3 m) long, yellow and black vertically striped cat. Called also Panthera tigris.

tiger heart
the striped and mottled myocardium of young cattle affected by a malignant form of foot-and-mouth disease.
tiger snake
tan to olive, with creamy yellow cross bands, venomous Australian snake. Envenomation is characterized by muscular weakness, flaccid paralysis, pupillary dilatation, restlessness, myoglobinuria, and a high serum creatine phosphokinase. Called also Notechis scutatus. Western tiger snake is called Notechis scutatus occidentalis.
tiger stripe
see reticulated leukotrichia.
tiger stripe colon
the striking lesion of parallel lines of hemorrhages and congestion in the colon of cattle with rinderpest, acute mucosal disease and bovine malignant catarrhal fever. Called also zebra marks.
References in periodicals archive ?
The de Havilland Tiger Moth II on display at Cosford and, inset, in flight
UPS AND DOWNS The Jersey Tiger moth is going great guns - though we can't expect to see any in the North for a while yet.
The Royal Mail branded Tiger Moth biplane carried a special mail bag of letters from UK school children as well as a personal letter from Royal Mail CEO Moya Greene to La Poste CEO Philippe Wahl The flight pays tribute to those early pioneers of aviation who braved often difficult conditions to get mail overseas and established it as a key communications channel.
Cliff, from the Wirral, first flew in a Tiger Moth as an observer with the Second Brigade Searchlight Regiment during the Second World War.
Tiger Moth Experience was one of the main sponsors of the bike ride along with support from Holmfirth brewery The Nook Brewhouse who began brewing Tiger Moth Porter earlier this year which also raises funds for The RAFBF.
It is the second vintage IAF aircraft to be restored after a Tiger Moth of 1930s vintage that has been flying regularly at air events.
The garden tiger moth population has declined by 92 per cent since 1968, according to a report recently published by Butterfly Conservation and Rothamstead Research.
Aspiring pilots will be given an hour-and-ten-minute lesson in the Tiger Moth, 40 minutes in the Harvard military plane and half-an-hour in the restored Spitfire.
It looks like working on the farm in the 1940s may not be as drab as some of us had imagined when a Tiger Moth lands bearing the husband of Joyce, above, who is whisked her away for an idyllic afternoon.
In 1944 or just after the war a Tiger Moth, biplane trainer, made a forced landing off the Pennyfine Road near Sunniside.
Yesterday, Martin Keen, of Liverpool Flying School, flew his original Tiger Moth along the same route.
Nearly 40 years on, Boeing Boeing looks as dated as a Tiger Moth.