tick-borne encephalitis virus


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tick-·borne en·ceph·a·li·tis vi·rus

arboviruses of the genus Flavivirus that occur in Central Europe and Russia in multiple subtypes, causing two forms of encephalitis in humans: tick-borne encephalitis (Central European subtype) and tick-borne encephalitis (Eastern subtype); the vectors are ticks of the genus Ixodes.

tick-borne en·ceph·a·li·tis vi·rus

(tik'bōrn en-sef'ă-lī'tis vī'rŭs)
An arbovirus of the genus Flavivirus that occurs in Central Europe, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia, in two subtypes, causing two forms of encephalitis in humans: tick-borne encephalitis (Central European subtype) and tick-borne encephalitis (Eastern European subtype); the vectors are ticks of the genus Ixodes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Louis encephalitis virus; JEV, Japanese B encephalitis virus; TBEV, tick-borne encephalitis virus.
Relation of genetic phylogeny and geographical distance of tick-borne encephalitis virus in central Europe.
Efficient transmission of tick-borne encephalitis virus between cofeeding ticks.
Seasonal dynamics of Ixodes ricinus in a 3-year period in northern Spain: first survey on the presence of tick-borne encephalitis virus.
Acute West Nile virus neuroinvasive infections: cross-reactivity with dengue virus and tick-borne encephalitis virus.
Identification of tick-borne encephalitis virus ribonucleic acid in tick suspensions and in clinical specimens by a reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction assay.
Vertical transmission of tick-borne encephalitis virus between generations of adapted reservoir small rodents.
Tick-borne encephalitis virus in wild rodents in winter, Finland, 2008-2009.
Tick-borne encephalitis virus transmission between ticks cofeeding on specific immune natural rodent hosts.
Natural tick-borne encephalitis virus infection among wild small mammals in the southeastern part of western Siberia, Russia.
Recovery of the tick-borne encephalitis virus from the blood and milk of subcutaneously infected sheep.
Kyasanur Forest disease (KFD) virus, a member of the tick-borne encephalitis virus serocomplex of the genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae, can cause fever, hemorrhage, and encephalitis and has a 3%-5% case-fatality ratio (l).