tick-borne encephalitis


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Related to tick-borne encephalitis: Japanese Encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis virus

tick-borne encephalitis

A flaviviral infection of the brain transmitted by Ixodes ticks.
See also: encephalitis
References in periodicals archive ?
A survey on cases of tick-borne encephalitis in European countries.
Some epidemiological aspects of infections caused by tick-borne encephalitis virus in the region of Gorj [in Romanian].
Seroprevalence of West Nile Virus and Tick-borne encephalitis virus in South Backa District and Nisava District.
For therapy, they use immunoglobulin, which contains ready-made antibodies against the virus of tick-borne encephalitis, antiviral agents, as well as drugs, which help to get rid of the symptoms.
The clinical and epidemiological profile of tick-borne encephalitis in southern Germany 1994-98: a prospective study of 656 patients.
Isolation of tick-borne encephalitis viruses from wild rodents, South Korea.
Seroprevalence of West Nile virus and tick-borne encephalitis virus in southeastern Turkey: first evidence for tick-borne encephalitis virus infections.
Louis encephalitis virus; JEV, Japanese B encephalitis virus; TBEV, tick-borne encephalitis virus.
The virus is known as an `arbovirus' or to give the illness its full name, tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and it causes swelling of the brain.
It advises pregnant women to avoid visiting east and west Africa, Thailand and Papua New Guinea where there is a high risk of malaria - and European and Scandinavian forests in late spring and summer when there is a risk of tick-borne encephalitis.
However, the Sonenshine and Mather book includes thorough discussions of the ecology of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Tick-borne Encephalitis, and Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever, and provides perspectives by European and African scientists lacking in the above-mentioned books.
Flaviviruses, responsible for diseases such as dengue, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis, are deadlier--but less menacing to look at--than their influenza- causing cousins.