tic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

tic

 [tik] (Fr.)
an involuntary, compulsive, rapid, repetitive, stereotyped movement or vocalization, experienced as irresistible although it can be suppressed for some length of time; occurrence is increased by stress and reduced during sleep or engrossing activities. Tics may be of psychogenic or neurogenic origin and are subclassified as either simple, such as eye blinking, shoulder shrugging, coughing, grunting, snorting, or barking; or complex, such as facial gestures, grooming motions, coprolalia (obscene language), echolalia (repeating the most recently heard word or sound), or echokinesis (imitation of another's movements).
tic douloureux a painful disorder of the trigeminal nerve, characterized by severe pain in the face and forehead on the affected side, extending to the midline of the face and head, triggered by stimuli such as cold drafts, chewing, drinking cold liquids, brushing the hair, or washing the face. Called also trigeminal neuralgia.

Treatment. Medical treatment is usually preferred, since surgical correction results in complete loss of sensation in the areas served by the nerve. The drugs employed include trichloroethylene administered by inhalation, niacin, potassium chloride, diethazine, and most recently carbamazepine. When surgery is resorted to, the patient must be watched for signs of corneal infection, which frequently occurs, usually because of loss of the corneal reflex, which normally provides a warning when foreign material or other injurious agents enter the eye. Postoperative instructions must be given so that the patient can take necessary measures for the protection of the eye after discharge from the hospital.
facial tic spasm of the facial muscles.

tic

(tik), Do not confuse this word with tick.
Habitual, repeated contraction of certain muscles, resulting in stereotyped individualized actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods, for example, clearing the throat, sniffing, pursing the lips, excessive blinking; especially prominent when the person is under stress; there is no known pathologic substrate.
See also: spasm.
[Fr.]

tic

(tĭk)
n.
1. A repetitive, rapid, sudden muscular movement or vocalization, usually experienced as involuntary or semivoluntary.
2. A quirk or habit of behavior or language: common phrases that have become verbal tics.
intr.v. ticced, ticcing, tics
To have a tic; produce tics: factors that affect the frequency of ticcing.
A sudden, repetitive, stereotyped, nonrhythmic movement—motor tic—or sound—phonic tic—involving discrete muscle groups, which may be invisible to the observer—e.g., abdominal tensing
Common tics Eye blinking, throat clearing
DiffDx Chorea, dystonia, myoclonus, autism and stereotypic movement disorder, compulsive movements of OCD and seizure activity

tic

Habit spasm A complex of multiple abrupt, coordinated involuntary and/or compulsive spasms, including eye blinking, facial gestures, vocalizations, shoulder shrugging, etc which, when controlled, may be followed by more intense and frequent 'rebound' contractions; tics may be exacerbated by stress and ameliorated by psychotherapy. See Dystonic tic, Motor tic, Tourette syndrome, Transient tic disorder, Verbal tic, Vocal tic. Cf Jumping Frenchmen of Maine syndrome Medtalk A popular synonym for diverticulosis.

tic

(tik)
Habitual, repeated contraction of certain muscles, resulting in stereotyped individualized actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods (e.g., clearing the throat, sniffing, pursing the lips, excessive blinking); especially prominent when the person is under stress; there is no known pathologic substrate.
See also: spasm
Synonym(s): Brissaud disease, habit spasm.
[Fr.]

Tic

Brief and intermittent involuntary movement or sound.
Mentioned in: Tourette Syndrome

Brissaud,

Edouard, French physician, 1852-1909.
Brissaud disease - habitual, repeated contraction of certain muscles, resulting in actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods. Synonym(s): tic
Brissaud infantilism - Synonym(s): infantile hypothyroidism
Brissaud reflex - tickling the sole causes a contraction of the tensor fasciae latae muscle, even when there is no responsive movement of the toes.
Brissaud-Marie syndrome - unilateral spasm of the tongue and lips, of hysterical nature.

tic

(tik)
Habitual, repeated contraction of some muscles, resulting in stereotyped individualized actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods, e.g., clearing the throat, sniffing.
[Fr.]

Patient discussion about tic

Q. Eczema tic itching leads making his skin reddish and abraded. My brothers eczema is very vulnerable to allergens. In spite of steps taken to eliminate this we have not succeeded much. His medicines do not help him. They cannot cure this immune disorder. They have started showing some side effects. His fight for eczema tic itching starts again once he stops his medicines. Eczema tic itching leads making his skin reddish and abraded. If any diet can help then please guide?

A. Though food can also trigger eczema symptoms. Thus you must avoid cow`s milk, eggs, shellfish. Avoid dusty areas, pollution. His doctor would have told about the allergens to be avoided just follow them. You can also make him have raw food. It’s said that they help reduce on the return of the symptoms. Use anything as natural as possible, like soaps, clothing and anything which is unnatural. This will help for the eczematic impact to reduce.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OUi3KAUCog&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/v6OUi3KAUCog_eczema_tips?q=eczema&feature=player_embedded

More discussions about tic
References in periodicals archive ?
Pese al interes evidente de relacion entre competencias en TIC y uso de las mismas por parte de los docentes, existen pocos trabajos que hayan indagado sobre dicha relacion (Arancibia, Paz & Contreras, 2010; Law & Chow, 2008; Puentes, Roig, Sanhueza & Friz, 2013; Saez, 2010; Suarez et al., 2010; Suarez Rodriguez et al., 2013; Tejedor & Garcia, 2006; Vargas, Chumpitaz, Suarez & Badia, 2014).
Para poder usar las TIC en las aulas resulta necesario un conocimiento tecnico de los medios (Saez, 2010) asi como que los docentes posean conocimientos acerca de como integrarlas en el curriculo y usarlas en los procesos de ensenanza-aprendizaje (Suarez et al., 2010).
La formacion del profesorado supone, por tanto, un factor de vital importancia para posibilitar una practica pedagogica orientada al uso efectivo de las TIC (Saez, 2010).
1.2 Las TIC con alumnado con necesidades educativas especiales intelectuales
* Dimension adopcion: las tecnologias son utilizadas como medios de informacion y la mayoria de los usuarios utilizan las TIC como consumidores.
* Dimension apropiacion: el uso de las TIC responde a un objetivo establecido por los usuarios y responde a necesidades especificas de una organizacion.
BEA produces quarterly and annual estimates of portfolio investment transactions based on data from the TIC survey Aggregate Holdings of Long-Term Securities by U.S.
The TIC system releases monthly transactions statistics on the net purchases of foreign stocks and bonds by U.S.
"Our expectation, initially, was that maybe 1 in 10 kids would still have tics at their follow-up exams," said first author Soyoung Kim, postdoctoral research associate at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Tic Toc Auto is trying to get a piece of that business by making car maintenance convenient and affordable.
Thirty-four children, constituted the case group, were diagnosed with tic disorders at the first time at the outpatient clinic of Ataturk University Medical Faculty Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and Gaziantep Maternity and Children Diseases Hospital, Child, and Adolescent Psychiatry.
En esta sucesion de programas ha habido una inversion creciente destinada a hacer extensivo el uso de las TIC en los centros docentes.