tibialis anterior muscle


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Related to tibialis anterior muscle: Tibialis posterior muscle

tib·i·al·is an·ter·i·or mus·cle

(tib-ē-ā'lis an-tēr'ē-ŏr mŭs'ĕl)
Medial muscle of anterior (dorsiflexor) compartment of leg; origin, upper two thirds of lateral surface of tibia, interosseous membrane, and overlying crural fascia; insertion, medial cuneiform and base of first metatarsal; action, dorsiflexion and inversion of foot; provides dynamic support of longitudinal and transverse arches of foot; nerve supply, deep peroneal.

tibialis anterior muscle

Leg muscle. Origin: lateral side of proximal tibia. Insertion: medial side of cuneiform bone, base of metatarsal 1. Nerve: deep peroneal (L4-L5). Action: inverts and dorsiflexes foot.
See also: muscle
References in periodicals archive ?
With respect to latency measures, there is currently a lack of knowledge on the effects of leg dominance on muscle reaction times of the peroneus longus or tibialis anterior muscles in healthy and sedentary individuals.
The results of this investigation indicate that dominance does not interfere with the evaluation of reaction times of peroneus longus or tibialis anterior muscles, ankle joint position sense, or ankle kinesthesia in healthy sedentary individuals.
In order to participate, subjects had to (1) have the ability to volitionally contract the tibialis anterior muscle, (2) have no serious medical conditions or pain, and (3) be between the ages of 15 and 80.
While control subjects regularly use tibialis anterior muscle control during gait and other activities, the people with transtibial amputation had not had functional use of this residual-limb muscle since before their amputation.
The most common site of a muscle herniation in the lower leg is the tibialis anterior muscle, since the anterolateral tibial compartment is more vulnerable to traumas (5,7).
The treatment of tibialis anterior muscle hernia depends on the patient's symptoms.
In conclusion, a tibialis anterior muscle herniation should be suspected in the differential diagnosis of a mass on the lower leg and, ultrasound imaging should be the preferred diagnostic method, since it is a non-invasive, relatively economical, highly accurate and readily available imaging technique.