tibial nerve


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tib·i·al nerve

[TA]
one of the two major divisions of the sciatic nerve, it courses down the back of the leg to terminate as the medial and lateral plantar nerves in the foot; it supplies the hamstring muscles, the muscles of the back of the leg (the dorsiflexors and invertors of the foot), and the plantar aspect of the foot, as well as the skin on the back of the leg and sole of the foot.

tib·i·al nerve

(tib'ē-ăl nĕrv) [TA]
One of the two major divisions of the sciatic nerve, itcourses down the back of the leg to terminate as the medial and lateral plantar nerves in the foot; it supplies the hamstring muscles, the muscles of the back of the leg (the dorsiflexors and invertors of the foot), and the plantar aspect of the foot, as well as the skin on the back of the leg and sole of the foot.
Synonym(s): nervus tibialis [TA] .
References in periodicals archive ?
Randomized trial of long-term effects of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation on chronic pelvic pain.
[14] Except for NCV, none of the parameters of posterior tibial nerve showed any correlation with the duration of diabetes.
Lower-extremity peripheral nerve injuries: A Louisiana state university health sciences center literature review with comparison of the operative outcomes of 806 Louisiana state university health sciences center sciatic, common peroneal, and tibial nerve lesions.
Group HC Ulnar nerve sensory NCV (m/s) 55.9 (50.6-31.3) Amp ([micro]V) 20.7 (12.8-41.7) Sural nerve sensory NCV (m/s) 54.9 (23.8-64.2) Amp ([micro]V) 10.7 (5.3-18.2) Ulnar nerve motor NCV (m/s) 61 (51-72) Amp (mV) 7.5 (5.7-10.8) Tibial nerve motor NCV (m/s) 49.5 (43.3-53.2) Amp (mV) 9.4 (5-18.6) Tx1 DM 1st exam.
Intraoperative finding demonstrated myonecrosis of the deep posterior compartment and the posterior tibal nerve surrounded by necrotizing tissue (status after posterior tibial nerve neurolysis).
Clinical tests include the dorsiflexion-eversion provocative manoeuvre in which the tibial nerve is compressed by positioning the ankle in passively maximally eversion and dorsiflexion while all of the metatarsophalangeal joints are maximally dorsiflexed and held in this position for five to ten seconds [3].
To produce comparable afferent input to the soleus motoneuron pool at rest and at the onset of dorsiflexion contraction, the tibial nerve stimulation intensity was adjusted, if necessary, to elicit an M-response of approximately 10% of [M.sub.max] in all trials.
To the best of our knowledge, there is no report in the literature that presented the case of a patient with BD with the signs and symptoms owing to isolated unilateral tibial nerve and superficial peroneal nerve involvements as in our patient.
Mikel Gray included a case study in which the patient received percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) as part of the plan of treatment of incontinence for a 78-year-old female patient.
Obturator nerve block was the most common phenol procedure performed (44.8%), followed by posterior tibial nerve block (37.9%).
This approach involves a neurolysis of the ulnar nerve at both the wrist and elbow, the median nerve at both the wrist and forearm, the tibial nerve in the four medial ankle tunnels, and the peroneal nerve at the knee, leg and foot dorsum.