thyroarytenoid muscles

thyroarytenoid muscles

two broad, flat muscles lateral to the fibroelastic membrane of the larynx and the laryngeal entricles and saccules. Each muscle runs from a vertical line of origin on the lower half of the thyroid angle and adjacent external surface of the cricothyroid ligament to the anterolateral surface of the arytenoid cartilage. Some of the fibers may continue into the aryepiglottic fold and reach the margin of the epiglottis. They act as sphincters to the laryngeal vestibule and also narrow the laryngeal inlet. They are innervated by the recurrent laryngeal branches of the vagus nerves.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of electrical stimulation of cricothyroid and thyroarytenoid muscles on voice fundamental frequency.
This may have been due to the effects of SES on the thyroarytenoid muscle via the stimulation of the ISLN, lowering the frequency of voice.
1 mL) of Botulinum Toxin injections to the thyroarytenoid muscles (see Figure 2) using a transcricoid approach under electromyography guidance.
Injections of BTX-A to the thyroarytenoid muscles were effective in breaking the cough cycle in all 3 children.
1 ml normal saline) were injected into each of two locations on each thyroarytenoid muscle with a 25-gauge laryngeal injection needle at the time of direct laryngoscopy.
For predominantly horizontal EVT, botulinum toxin can be injected into both thyroarytenoid muscles.
The thyroarytenoid muscles and the crico thyroid muscles share responsibility for creating vocal fold thickening and stretching, and one continually isolated from the other is simply bad voice pedagogy for any age group and any style of singing.
Laboratory studies conducted on singers show that chest voice is produced by contraction of the thyroarytenoid muscles (TA).
Pairs of hookedwire, stainless steel electrodes were put in the subject's cricothyroid and thyroarytenoid muscles in order to directly measure muscle activation.
The movement is primarily activated by continuous differential engagement of the cricothyroid and thyroarytenoid muscles in conjunction with finely tuned respiratory control.
The thyroarytenoid muscles are, of course, the "closers" of the vocal folds, while the cricothyroid muscles are the "stretchers.
Research has revealed that two primary muscles are responsible for vocal fold activity: the thyroarytenoid muscles (TA) and the cricothyroid muscles (CT).