thymic hyperplasia

thymic hyperplasia

A generic term for an increase in size and weight of the thymus, which may be true hyperplasia (e.g., rebound hyperplasia post-chemotherapy) or “pseudohyperplasia”, in which the normal architectural is maintained with a marked increase in germinal centres, often associated with autoimmune disease (in particular myasthenia gravis).
References in periodicals archive ?
In general there are two types of thymic hyperplasia: true thymic hyperplasia and lymphoid thymic hyperplasia.
First, in the introduction, the authors reported that thymectomy is not therapeutic for thymic hyperplasia.
Thymic hyperplasia and neoplasia: a review of current concepts.
Typically, thymic hyperplasia has a homogenous mass which may lose signal on out-of-phase MR imaging.
The computed tomography scan explores the presence of a thymoma or thymic hyperplasia.
Chemical-shift MRI has been shown to be useful in distinguishing normal thymus and thymic hyperplasia from thymic neoplasms and lymphoma.
The one-year period was considered necessary in order to bypass any transient thymic hyperplasia that might occur in the first few months after surgery.
Histologically, thymic hyperplasia can be divided into two distinct types: true hyperplasia and lymphoid (follicular) hyperplasia.
1) recently proved the benefit of thymectomy in patients with nonthymomatous myasthenia gravis, including lymphoid thymic hyperplasia, for improving clinical outcomes and reducing the need for immunosuppressive therapy," we would like to underline that our manuscript reads "while thymectomy is often performed for thymoma, it is not therapeutic for thymic hyperplasia.
True thymic hyperplasia is diagnosed when there is >50% increase in thymic volume over baseline, usually within a year of the stress period, with preserved microscopic features.