thunderclap headache


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Related to thunderclap headache: ice pick headache

thunderclap headache

sudden severe nonlocalizing head pain not associated with any abnormal neurologic findings; of varied etiology, including subarachnoid hemorrhage, migraine, carotid or vertebral artery dissection, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and idiopathic causes.
A distinct severe headache that occurs days to weeks before the index episode of intracranial bleeding, often from a subarachnoid haemorrhage—seen in 20% to 50% of patients; it develops within seconds, 'maxes' in minutes, and lasts for hours to days; the headache may be accompanied by nuchal rigidity, decreased consciousness, papilloedema, retinal haemorrhage, 3rd and/or 6th nerve palsy, bilateral leg weakness, nystagmus, ataxia, aphasia, abulia, hemiparesis, left-sided visual neglect
DiffDx Acute expansion, dissection, or thrombosis of unruptured aneurysm, venous sinus thrombosis, sexual headaches, benign thunderclap headache

thun·der·clap head·ache

(thŭn'dĕr-klap hed'āk)
Sudden severe nonlocalizing head pain not associated with any abnormal neurologic findings; of varied etiology, including subarachnoid hemorrhage, migraine, carotid or vertebral artery dissection, and cavernous sinus thrombosis.

thunderclap headache

A very severe headache that occurs suddenly and without warning. Such headaches may signify several dangerous possibilities including subarachnoid haemorrhage, intracerebral haemorrhage, subdural or epidural haematoma, acute ischaemic stroke, dissection of a vertebral or carotid artery, pituitary apoplexy or a cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. More commonly, the thunderclap headache implies nothing more grave than a migraine or a benign sexual headache.

thun·der·clap head·ache

(thŭn'dĕr-klap hed'āk)
Sudden severe nonlocalizing head pain not associated with any abnormal neurologic findings; of varied etiology.
References in periodicals archive ?
He noted that thunderclap headache caused by a brain hemorrhage is often accompanied by nausea, a stiff neck and sensitivity to light.
Last week in the international medical journal the Lancet, the researchers reported that the women had thunderclap headaches caused by cerebral venous sinus thrombosis - a clot blocking the large vein along the top of the brain.
A thunderclap headache was an isolated symptom in 10% of patients with SAH.
Any patient who comes in with a thunderclap headache and you're equivocating whether to CT or conduct a lumbar puncture, you never hesitate to overinvestigate that patient" because of the early rebleeding risk, he said.