thujone


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Related to thujone: wormwood, absinthe

thu·jone

(thū'jōn),
Chief constituent of cedar leaf oil; a stimulant and convulsant similar to camphor.

thujone

(tho͞o′jōn′, thyo͞o′-)
n.
A ketone, C10H16O, that is thought to be a neurotoxin and is found in certain plants such as the wormwood Artemisia absinthium, an ingredient in absinthe.

thujone

Pharmacognosy
A ketone and a monoterpene found in nature in alpha and beta forms, which is present in the leaves of cedars (Thuja occidentalis) and many other plants (e.g., junipers, mugwort, oregano, common sage, tansy, wormwood). It acts on GABA and 5HT3 receptors and has been used topically. In contrast to popular belief, the spirit absinthe contains only minute amounts of thujone, which has long been held responsible for absinthe’s alleged psychedelic effects.

Toxicity
Internal ingestion is associated with convulsions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thujone, whose latin name is Artemisia absinthium, is a toxin extracted from wormwood plants that some EU lawmakers worry is too harmful, especially in higher concentrations.
Ada cayinin damitilmasiyla elde edilen ada cayi yaginin, thujone, camphor ve cineole icerdigi, bu maddelerin epileptojenik ozellik tasidigi ve deneysel bir calismada diger bitkisel ilaclarla karsilastirildiginda cok daha dusuk dozlarda konvulziyonla belirgin zehirlenme tablolarina neden oldugu bildirilmistir (7).
Magnan went on to isolate thujone from wormwood and confirmed its toxic potential by showing it caused convulsions followed by death in a dog.
Further, the principle flavoring ingredient, Artemesia absinthium, or Grand Wormwood, contained thujone, which was said to be a carcinogen and/or hallucinogenic at very high concentrations.
The supposed culprit was a neurotoxin called thujone found in absinthe's integral ingredient, wormwood.
Thujone can, in large quantities, provoke renal failure or convulsions.
absinthium has been the object of several studies [1-12], especially for its contents of such compounds as thujone isomers and chamazulene with pharmacodynamic properties.
5); and thujone alpha and beta (10, with 35 for vermouth and absinthe);
However, don't take large doses of yarrow as thujone (just one of its 120 chemical compounds) is considered toxic.
Similar efforts are already under way in the United States, including NTP-funded studies on ginkgo, echinacea, ginseng, kava kava, and the plant compounds pulegone and thujone.
Its apparently mild hallucinogenic properties are produced by the active ingredient thujone, which comes from wormwood.
They include organic acids (acetic, benzoic, cinnamic and phenylacetic); alcohols (benzyl alcohol, borneol, cinnamyl alcohol, citronellol, geraniol, linalool, menthol, phenylethyl alcohol and terpineol); aldehydes (anisic aldehyde, cinnamic aldehyde, benzaldehyde, citral, piperonal or heliotropin, salicylic aldehyde and vanillin); ketones (carvones, camphor, thujone, pulegone, etc; esters such as bornyl acetate, methyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, geranyl acetate and linalyl acetate); phenols (thymol, carvacrol and chavicol); phenol ethers (anethol, eugenol and safrol) and many other more complex compounds such as coumarin and indol.