thromboplastin

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Related to thromboplastin time: Thrombin time

thromboplastin

 [throm″bo-plas´tin]
tissue thromboplastin factor III, a coagulation factor derived from several different sources in the body, such as brain and lung; it is important in the formation of extrinsic prothrombin converting principle in the extrinsic pathway of coagulation. Called also tissue factor. See also activated partial thromboplastin time.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

throm·bo·plas·tin

(throm'bō-plas'tin),
A substance present in tissues, platelets, and leukocytes necessary for the coagulation of blood; in the presence of calcium ions thromboplastin is necessary for the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, an important step in coagulation of blood. It is now generally believed that thromboplastin activity may be developed through blood (intrinsic) or tissue (extrinsic) systems. Tissue thromboplastin (factor III) interacts with factor VII and calcium to activate factor X; active factor X combines with factor V in the presence of calcium and phospholipid to produce thromboplastin activity (also commonly called thromboplastin).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

thromboplastin

(thrŏm′bō-plăs′tĭn)
n.
A protease that converts prothrombin to thrombin in the early stages of blood clotting. Also called thrombokinase.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

throm·bo·plas·tin

(throm'bō-plas'tin)
A substance present in tissues, platelets, and leukocytes necessary for the coagulation of blood; in the presence of calcium ions, thromboplastin is necessary for the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, an important step in blood coagulation.
Synonym(s): platelet tissue factor, thrombokinase.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

thromboplastin

Blood clotting factor III, an obsolete term referring to what is now known to be several blood clotting factors operating together.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

thromboplastin

see BLOOD CLOTTING.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Thromboplastin

A protein in blood that converts prothrombin to thrombin.
Mentioned in: Prothrombin Time
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

throm·bo·plas·tin

(throm'bō-plas'tin)
A substance present in tissues, platelets, and leukocytes necessary for the coagulation of blood.
Synonym(s): platelet tissue factor, thrombokinase.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time of hypertensive patients increase with increase in duration of hypertension which may be due to prolonged endothelial wall effect as this will lead to sustained release of vasoactive substances that interfere coagulation cascades, and these indices eventually decrease as the antihypertensive therapy continues, even lower than before they started treatment; this finding is in consonance with Lee's work and that of Mirsaiedi et al.
Activated partial thromboplastin time also was significantly affected by bilirubin and free Hb in heparinized samples: it was shortened by 7% to 9% with each increment of free Hb by 100 mg/dL (Figure 1, A) and prolonged by 7% to 8% with increased bilirubin concentration by 6 mg/dL (Figure 1, B).
In the multivariate analysis, only reactive thrombocytosis (odds ratio 5.9, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 27.8, P=0.025) and activated partial thromboplastin time (odds ratio 0.93,95% confidence interval 0.87 to 0.99, P=0.014) were significantly associated with evidence of having a strong in vitro thrombotic tendency in the full multivariable and parsimony models (Table 3); clinical diagnosis, fibrinogen concentration and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score were not significantly associated with evidence of a strong in vitro thrombotic tendency.
Prothrombin time was raised in 25(55.5%) women (pless than 0.5), and activated partial thromboplastin time was raised in 18(40%) (pless than 0.05) (Table-2).
Activated partial thromboplastin time was the most commonly used laboratory monitoring test, followed by prothrombin time.
In one study by Hui C, Lili M et al; the TEG Prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, international normalized ratio, and thrombomodulin and resistance index in uterine arteries showed a tendency to decrease in pregnant women [14].
A continuous infusion of heparin (750 to 850 UI.[hour.sup.-1]) was given throughout the system in order to prevent device clotting, targeting an activated partial thromboplastin time between 65 to 75 seconds.
(3,4) Mechanically hemolyzed patient specimens have exhibited significant differences in prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), compared to non-hemolyzed specimens.
Blood pressure, leukocyte count, hemoglobin, platelet count, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, C-reactive protein, serum electrolytes, alanine amino- transferase (ALT), serum protein, serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, proteinuria, and microscopic qualitative and quantitative (Addis count) urine analysis were evaluated.
In addition, patients will have low fibrinogen and prolonged pro-thrombin time and partial thromboplastin time, which is never the case with preeclampsia without abruption.
His prothrombin time was 14.4 seconds, and his activated partial thromboplastin time was 73 seconds.
The prothrombin time was elevated at 17.1 seconds, control 12.3 seconds, and the partial thromboplastin time was 30.3 seconds, control 28.7 seconds.