thromboplastin


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Related to thromboplastin: Prothrombin time

thromboplastin

 [throm″bo-plas´tin]
tissue thromboplastin factor III, a coagulation factor derived from several different sources in the body, such as brain and lung; it is important in the formation of extrinsic prothrombin converting principle in the extrinsic pathway of coagulation. Called also tissue factor. See also activated partial thromboplastin time.

throm·bo·plas·tin

(throm'bō-plas'tin),
A substance present in tissues, platelets, and leukocytes necessary for the coagulation of blood; in the presence of calcium ions thromboplastin is necessary for the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, an important step in coagulation of blood. It is now generally believed that thromboplastin activity may be developed through blood (intrinsic) or tissue (extrinsic) systems. Tissue thromboplastin (factor III) interacts with factor VII and calcium to activate factor X; active factor X combines with factor V in the presence of calcium and phospholipid to produce thromboplastin activity (also commonly called thromboplastin).

thromboplastin

(thrŏm′bō-plăs′tĭn)
n.
A protease that converts prothrombin to thrombin in the early stages of blood clotting. Also called thrombokinase.

throm·bo·plas·tin

(throm'bō-plas'tin)
A substance present in tissues, platelets, and leukocytes necessary for the coagulation of blood; in the presence of calcium ions, thromboplastin is necessary for the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, an important step in blood coagulation.
Synonym(s): platelet tissue factor, thrombokinase.

thromboplastin

Blood clotting factor III, an obsolete term referring to what is now known to be several blood clotting factors operating together.

thromboplastin

see BLOOD CLOTTING.

Thromboplastin

A protein in blood that converts prothrombin to thrombin.
Mentioned in: Prothrombin Time

throm·bo·plas·tin

(throm'bō-plas'tin)
A substance present in tissues, platelets, and leukocytes necessary for the coagulation of blood.
Synonym(s): platelet tissue factor, thrombokinase.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prolonged prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time due to underfilled specimen tubes with 109 mmol/L (3.2%) citrate anticoagulant.
activated partial thromboplastin time for monitoring unfractionated heparin: A pilot study.
Califf et al., "Activated partial thromboplastin time and outcome after thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction: results from the GUSTO-I trial," Circulation, vol.
One-Stage Prothrombin Time (PT) Test and Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT) Test; Approved Guideline H47-A2, 2nd edn.
aPTT, a modified version of the activated Partial Thromboplastin Time test, is a test that measures the intrinsic pathway of coagulation.
Table 1 shows the mean and standard deviation for the systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, prothrombin time test, and activated partial thromboplastin time test of hypertensives and normotensives including the duration of hypertensive subjects enrolled in the study.
Thromboelastography as a better indicator of hypercoagulable state after injury than prothrombin time or activated partial thromboplastin time.
Thus, coagulation time of the constant R, reflecting velocity of thromboplastin production, lengthened by 62%, K--time of clot production lengthened by 63%, thromboelastograph constant R/K, showing use of prothrombin by thromboplastin, increased by 3.2%.
The number of patients classified as coagulopathic varied greatly according to the particular diagnostic criteria used; 164 patients (33.95%) met one of the three diagnostic criteria (an abnormality in either prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, or platelet count), and 32 patients (6.63%) met two or three of these criteria.
Unfractionated heparin (UF) is commonly used in anticoagulant therapy and is monitored by a variety of methods including activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), anti-Xa assays, and during surgery or other invasive procedures by the activated clotting time (ACT).
The study looked for associations between half a million genetic markers and time taken for blood to clot, measured by a test called activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT).

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