thromboplastin


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Related to thromboplastin: Prothrombin time

thromboplastin

 [throm″bo-plas´tin]
tissue thromboplastin factor III, a coagulation factor derived from several different sources in the body, such as brain and lung; it is important in the formation of extrinsic prothrombin converting principle in the extrinsic pathway of coagulation. Called also tissue factor. See also activated partial thromboplastin time.

throm·bo·plas·tin

(throm'bō-plas'tin),
A substance present in tissues, platelets, and leukocytes necessary for the coagulation of blood; in the presence of calcium ions thromboplastin is necessary for the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, an important step in coagulation of blood. It is now generally believed that thromboplastin activity may be developed through blood (intrinsic) or tissue (extrinsic) systems. Tissue thromboplastin (factor III) interacts with factor VII and calcium to activate factor X; active factor X combines with factor V in the presence of calcium and phospholipid to produce thromboplastin activity (also commonly called thromboplastin).

thromboplastin

/throm·bo·plas·tin/ (-plas´tin) coagulation factor III.
tissue thromboplastin  coagulation factor III.

thromboplastin

(thrŏm′bō-plăs′tĭn)
n.
A protease that converts prothrombin to thrombin in the early stages of blood clotting. Also called thrombokinase.

thromboplastin

a plasma protein that initiates the clotting process by converting prothrombin to thrombin in the presence of calcium ions.

throm·bo·plas·tin

(throm'bō-plas'tin)
A substance present in tissues, platelets, and leukocytes necessary for the coagulation of blood; in the presence of calcium ions, thromboplastin is necessary for the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, an important step in blood coagulation.
Synonym(s): platelet tissue factor, thrombokinase.

thromboplastin

Blood clotting factor III, an obsolete term referring to what is now known to be several blood clotting factors operating together.

thromboplastin

see BLOOD CLOTTING.

Thromboplastin

A protein in blood that converts prothrombin to thrombin.
Mentioned in: Prothrombin Time

throm·bo·plas·tin

(throm'bō-plas'tin)
A substance present in tissues, platelets, and leukocytes necessary for the coagulation of blood.
Synonym(s): platelet tissue factor, thrombokinase.

thromboplastin

a substance in blood and tissues which, in the presence of ionized calcium, aids in the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin. Extrinsic and intrinsic thromboplastin are formed as the result of the interaction of different clotting factors; the factors that combine to form extrinsic thromboplastin are not all derived from intravascular sources, whereas those that form intrinsic thromboplastin are.

activated partial thromboplastin time
see activated partial thromboplastin time.
extrinsic thromboplastin
the prothrombin activator formed as a result of interaction of coagulation factors III, VII, and X which, with factor IV, aids in the formation of thrombin.
thromboplastin generation time (TGT)
evaluates the first stage in blood coagulation by measuring the efficiency of prothrombinase formation.
intrinsic thromboplastin
the prothrombin activator formed as a result of interaction of coagulation factors V, VII, IX, X, XI and XII and platelet factor 3 (PF-3), which, with factor IV, aids in the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin.
plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA)
clotting factor XI; deficiency occurs in cattle and dogs, causing mild to severe bleeding tendencies called hemophilia C.
plasma thromboplastin component (PTC)
clotting factor IX; deficiency causes christmas disease. Called also Christmas factor, antihemophilic factor B, autoprothrombin II.
thromboplastin time
see activated partial thromboplastin time.
tissue thromboplastin
factor III, a material derived from several sources in the body (e.g. brain, lung), and is important in the formation of extrinsic prothrombin converting principle in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. Called also tissue factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
activated partial thromboplastin time for monitoring unfractionated heparin: A pilot study.
Table 1: Clotting time of blood treated with mushroom extracts in activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) assay.
Results (mean [+ or -] SD) of activated partial thromboplastin time (APPT) and prothrombin time (PT) assays (in seconds) and measurement of plasma fibrinogen levels from 5 avian species.
Activated partial thromboplastin time also was significantly affected by bilirubin and free Hb in heparinized samples: it was shortened by 7% to 9% with each increment of free Hb by 100 mg/dL (Figure 1, A) and prolonged by 7% to 8% with increased bilirubin concentration by 6 mg/dL (Figure 1, B).
Platelet poor plasma was taken for estimation of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time with the help of coagulometer.
Determination of normal versus abnormal activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time after cardiopulmonary bypass.
Hematological parameters, including hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelet count, peripheral smear, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, electrolytes, bleeding time, prothrombin, thrombin, and partial thromboplastin time, and coagulation factors are usually within normal limits.
To assess the coagulation profile, I recommend the use of the whole-blood clotting test ("red-top tube test"), described in my editorial, and the measurement of prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, platelets, and fibrinogen.
In the pooled analysis, ginkgo significantly reduced blood viscosity, but had no significant effect on ADP-induced platelet aggregation, fibrinogen concentration, prothrombin time, or activated partial thromboplastin time.
If his prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time are abnormal, fresh frozen plasma may help correct a clotting factor deficiency.

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