thromboembolism

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Related to thromboembolisms: thrombotic occlusion

thromboembolism

 [throm″bo-em´bo-lizm]
obstruction of a blood vessel with thrombotic material carried by the blood from the site of origin to plug another vessel.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

throm·bo·em·bo·lism

(throm'bō-em'bŏ-lizm),
Embolism from a thrombus.
[thrombo- + G. embolismos, embolism]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

thromboembolism

(thrŏm′bō-ĕm′bə-lĭz′əm)
n.
The blocking of a blood vessel by a blood clot dislodged from its site of origin.

throm′bo·em·bol′ic (-ĕm-bŏl′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

throm·bo·em·bo·lism

(throm'bō-em'bŏ-lizm)
Embolism from a thrombus.
[thrombo- + G. embolismos, embolism]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

thromboembolism

An EMBOLISM caused by a dislodged THROMBUS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Thromboembolism

A clot in the blood that forms and blocks a blood vessel. It can lead to infarction, or death of the surrounding tissue due to lack of blood supply.
Mentioned in: Splenectomy
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

throm·bo·em·bo·lism

(throm'bō-em'bŏ-lizm)
Embolism from a thrombus.
[thrombo- + G. embolismos, embolism]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
We aimed to present a case of renal artery thromboembolism in which we applied low-dose slow-infusion thrombolytic therapy (LDSITT), and we have not observed any complication such as cerebral and noncerebral hemorrhage.
The primary endpoint measured was recurrent venous thromboembolism. A composite endpoint was major hemorrhage (bleeding that required hospitalization or transfusion), recurrent venous thromboembolism, and death from any cause.
Low-intensity warfarin reduced the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism by 64% (hazard ratio [HR]=0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.19-0.67; P<.001; number needed to treat [NNT]=22).
Even if no conclusive evidence has to date come from clinical studies to suggest that patients with genetic abnormalities (24-27) or antiphospholipid antibodies (28) should be treated for a longer time or more intensively than patients with idiopathic venous thromboembolism, information on the causes of thrombosis may help clinicians to make decisions involving individual patients.
However, if one considers the relatively low risk of thromboembolism associated with these two conditions (10, 15), it must be concluded that a general screening is not warranted.
Furthermore, oral anticoagulants, given for prevention of thromboembolism after the acute event, affect the results of testing for PC, PS, and APC resistance.
Furthermore, for some conditions, such as moderate hyperhomocysteinemia, the association of thromboembolism and the phenotype has clearly been established, whereas that for the genotype has not [see Ref.
This modification is highly (close to 100%) sensitive and specific for FV Leiden (58,59) in both healthy controls and patients with suspected acute venous thromboembolism. Finally, a third possibility is DNA analysis to detect FV Leiden (5).