thromboelastography


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thromboelastography

(throm″bō-ĕ-las-tog′ră-fē) [ thrombo- + elasto- + -graphy]
A technique that evaluates the ability of whole blood to coagulate. The technique measures the time it takes for blood to clot, and the firmness or shear strength of the clot. It is used, e.g., to identify the presence of hypercoagulable diseases.
References in periodicals archive ?
Safe removal of an epidural catheter 72 hours after clopidogrel and aspirin administrations guided by platelet function analysis and thromboelastography. J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol 2013; 29: 99-101.
Thromboelastography does not detect preinjury antiplatelet therapy in acute trauma patients.
Thromboelastography (TEG) is often used to measure coagulation dynamics in the setting of acute ischemic stroke and thrombolytic therapy.
Numerous physicians and researchers using the classic VET technologies of thromboelastography and thromboelastometry have done much of the heavy lifting to challenge convention and to transform acute bleeding management in many clinical settings.
Thromboelastography in the management of coagulopathy associated with Ebola virus disease.
In addition, anticoagulation protocols mainly utilize heparin and take into account measuring partial thromboplastin times (PTT), measuring R time using thromboelastography (TEG), and obtaining anti-Xa and antithrombin 3 levels.
In 2016, a consensus about Management of congenital quantitative fibrinogen disorders achieved among invited haemophilia experts from Belgium, France and Switzerland was also published.18 Even though the type, dose and frequency of fibrinogen replacement treatment were suggested, venous or arterial thrombosis still occurred in 30% patients in the case report series.2,19 Some researchers have suggested that thromboelastography may predict risks of thrombosis complication occurrence in (hypo) dysfibrinogenemia patients.20 Such a method could be a helpful tool for physicians to decide whether fibrinogen replacement is required, however, more studies are needed to further explore its diagnostic value.
However, there were large, consistent reductions in clotting times of 60-70% as assessed by thromboelastography (TEG) regardless of cell source or growth supplement (Supplemental Table 1).
Current in vitro assays of fibrinolytic reactions, such as clot-lysis tests, thromboelastography, and rotational thromboelastometry, are generally performed in the absence of blood flow; this limits their relevance to pathologic arterial thrombosis or physiological hemostasis [22, 23].
Correlations among PL-11 and another three major assays (light transmission aggregometry (LTA), Verify Now aspirin system, and thromboelastography (TEG)) suggested the ability of PL-11 to assess platelet function.
[22] They also noted that thromboelastography was inferior to INR or aPTT in identification of critical clotting factor deficits.