thromboangiitis


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Related to thromboangiitis: Buerger's disease

thromboangiitis

 [throm″bo-an″je-i´tis]
inflammation of a blood vessel (vasculitis) with thrombosis.
thromboangiitis obli´terans a disease affecting the medium-sized blood vessels, particularly the arteries of the lower limbs, which can cause severe pain and in serious cases lead to gangrene. The name refers to the clotting, pain, and inflammation occurring in this disease and to the fact that it can obliterate, or destroy, blood vessels. The cause has been thought to be excessive use of tobacco over a long period of time, and the number of cases has diminished strikingly in recent years. The intense pain is caused by thrombosis (formation of blood clots) in the lining of the arteries; when the clots grow larger, the blood flow slows and may stop entirely. Since every part of the body depends on the continuous flow of blood, affected areas such as fingers and toes, for example, soon begin to atrophy or develop ulcers. If the causes of the disease are not completely arrested, amputation may be necessary.



To treat the disease, the patient must stop smoking at once and entirely. This generally results in the partial healing of the affected membrane with a renewed flow of blood. However, more blood may have to be brought to damaged tissue by surgical methods of channeling detours or making canals in the clot itself. Sympathectomy may be tried to prevent any vasospastic component. Minor amputations of gangrenous tissue are often needed.

Special exercises called buerger-allen exercises are sometimes used to empty the engorged blood vessels and stimulate collateral circulation. These exercises can be done at home by patients and are usually prescribed to be done several times during the day. Patients are also instructed to avoid wearing any tight clothing, such as tight girdles, rolled garters, constricting belts, and other items that may impair circulation. They should also avoid sitting or standing in one position for long periods of time. Care should be used in the selection of shoes and stockings so that they fit properly and do not cause pressure against the blood vessels. Patients should be told to avoid walking barefoot or otherwise subjecting themselves to the hazards of trauma to the feet and legs. Should such an accident occur, no matter how minor it may seem, the patient must notify a health care provider so that treatment may be begun and infection and ulceration can be prevented.

throm·bo·an·gi·i·tis

(throm'bō-an'jē-ī'tis),
Inflammation of the intima of a blood vessel, with thrombosis.
[thrombo- + G. angeion, vessel, + -itis, inflammation]

throm·bo·an·gi·i·tis

(throm'bō-an'jē-ī'tis)
Inflammation of the intima of a blood vessel, with thrombosis.
[thrombo- + G. angeion, vessel, + -itis, inflammation]
References in periodicals archive ?
Thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease) and smokeless tobacco.
Yang, "Protective effect of Shenfu injection on thromboangiitis obliterans model rats," Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol.
By reporting a patient having CRAO caused by thromboangiitis obliterans we aimed to emphasize other etiologies of the retinal artery occlusion.
Enrolled CLI patients were either suffering from atherosclerotic PAD or Thromboangiitis Obliterans (TAO), also known as Buerger's disease.
Keywords: Buerger's disease, Thromboangiitis obliterans, Small intestine.
Critical limb isqchemia in a young man: Saddle embolism or unusual presentation of thromboangiitis obliterans?
As in many other rather uncommon diseases, the diagnosis of PV may be overlooked unless it is explicitly considered, and it is likely that many cases are never correctly diagnosed but rather masquerade under the diagnosis of various types of peripheral vascular disease including thromboangiitis obliterans (Burger's disease), atypical erythromelalgia, or hypertension.
Absolute contraindications include an inadequate circulation to the extremity, Raynaud syndrome, thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger disease), full-thickness burn over insertion site and skin infection over insertion site; whereas uncontrolled coagulopathy, systemic anticoagulation, inadequate collateral flow from ulnar artery on Allen test and atherosclerosis are its relative contra-indications2,3.
(A notation is that it also acts against such vascular diseases as thromboangiitis obliterans, or Buerger's disease, and perhaps against arteriosclerosis--a potential option against angioplasty or heart bypass surgery.) An update is furnished by Jessica Marshall in the 12 January issue of NewScientist.
Additional exclusion criteria were PAD attributable to nonatherosclerotic causes (cardioembolic disease, thromboangiitis obliterans, vasculitis, or congenital or metabolic vascular disease) and a history or presence of any malignancy.