thrombin


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Related to thrombin: antithrombin, Thrombin time

thrombin

 [throm´bin]
1. the activated form of coagulation factor II (prothrombin), which catalyzes the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin.
2. a preparation of this compound prepared from prothrombin of bovine origin, used as a topical hemostatic.
thrombin time (TT) the time required for plasma fibrinogen to form thrombin: exogenous thrombin is added to citrated plasma and the time to clot formation is measured. Prolonged TT is seen with abnormalities of fibrinogen and in the presence of heparin or degradation products of fibrin or fibrinogen.

throm·bin

(throm'bin),
1. An enzyme (proteinase), formed in shed blood, that converts fibrinogen into fibrin by hydrolyzing peptides (and amides and esters) of l-arginine; formed from prothrombin by the action of prothrombinase (factor Xa, another proteinase).
2. A sterile protein substance prepared from prothrombin of bovine origin through interaction with thromboplastin in the presence of calcium; causes clotting of whole blood, plasma, or a fibrinogen solution; used as a topical hemostatic for capillary bleeding with or without fibrin foam in general and plastic surgical procedures.

thrombin

(thrŏm′bĭn)
n.
A protease in blood that facilitates blood clotting by converting fibrinogen to fibrin.

thrombin

Hematology A key clot promoting enzyme that converts fibrinogen to fibrin and protects against fibrinolysis by activating thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. See Fibrin, Fibrinolysis, TAFI.

throm·bin

(throm'bin)
1. An enzyme (proteinase), formed in shed blood, that converts fibrinogen into fibrin by hydrolyzing peptides (and amides and esters) of l-arginine; formed from prothrombin by the action of prothrombinase (factor Xa, another proteinase).
2. A sterile protein substance prepared from prothrombin of bovine origin through interaction with thromboplastin in the presence of calcium; causes clotting of whole blood, plasma, or a fibrinogen solution; used as a topical hemostatic for capillary bleeding with or without fibrin foam in general and plastic surgical procedures.
Synonym(s): factor IIa.

thrombin

An enzyme in the blood that converts fibrinogen to fibrin, thus forming a blood clot.

thrombin

see BLOOD CLOTTING.

Thrombin

Thrombin is a protein produced by the body. It is a specific clotting factor that plays an important role in the blood clotting process.

throm·bin

(throm'bin)
1. An enzyme (proteinase), formed in shed blood, which converts fibrinogen into fibrin by hydrolyzing peptides (and amides and esters) of l-arginine; formed from prothrombin by the action of prothrombinase.
2. A sterile protein substance prepared from prothrombin of bovine origin through interaction with thromboplastin in the presence of calcium; causes clotting; used as a topical hemostatic for capillary bleeding in general and plastic surgical procedures.
Synonym(s): factor IIa.
References in periodicals archive ?
Experimental group: 500 mg fat tissue; 0.30 cc thrombin combined Group (1\1)
(28.)Coughlin SR Thrombin signalling and protease-activated receptors Nature 2000, 407 258-64.
Once bound to the tumor blood vessel surface, the nanorobot was programmed, like the notorious Trojan horse, to deliver its unsuspecting drug cargo in the very heart of the tumor, exposing an enzyme called thrombin that is key to blood clotting.
The clinical use and immunologic impact of thrombin in surgery.
Surprisingly, inhibition of thrombin activity prior to LPS injection results in a reduction of both the inflammatory and coagulation responses in the brain.
Therapeutic options include surgical resections, conservative surveillance, compression, thrombin injection, and catheter-based embolization.
[12] evaluated a series of natural flavonoids as potential thrombin inhibitors by optimized method of thrombin time and found that myricetin and quercetin were the best thrombin inhibitors.
In another approach, the folding-based GQ electrochemical biosensor for thrombin was prepared by covalently attaching to a gold electrode an ODN sequence that contained a 15-base TBA sequence at its 3' end and formed a double-helix with a MB-tagged partially complementary ODN sequence [99].
If the TT is also prolonged, then hypofibrinogenemia, dysfibrinogenemia, anticoagulant use (direct thrombin inhibitor), and exposure to bovine thrombin must be considered.
Moreover, it is highly likely that thrombin activation during serum preparation further enhances cTnT degradation to its primary fragment, though it is not the root cause.
It can be explained because the mutation at residue Arg596 affects the sodium-binding region of thrombin and, accordingly, decreases its affinity for fibrinogen.