THRIVE

(redirected from thriving)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Thrombin Inhibitor in Venous Thromboembolism. A clinical study that assessed the efficacy of ximelagatran (Exanta), an oral thrombin inhibitor in preventing venous thrombo-embolism—VTE
Conclusions Ximelagatran is better than a placebo for extended prevention of VTE
Nonetheless, in 2004 the FDA rejected Exanta because of its adverse renal and cardiovascular effects
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, Abid and Ahmed (2016), describe thriving at work with three-dimensional factors being cognitive; effective, and behavioral.
Therefore, it is projected that perceptions of organizational politics will moderate the relationship between managerial coaching and employees' thriving at work.
Thriving is a construct that is situated at the intersection of positive psychology and higher education (Schreiner, "Thriving in College"), building on Bean and Eaton's psychological model of college student retention as well as Keyes and Haidt's concept of flourishing.
The researchers are anxious to probe the employees' thriving at the workplace.
The diversity among the thriving banks is the basis for the third phase of our analysis, in which we examine various facets of that diversity.
Each of the five elements of well-being is additive, so an individual who is thriving in two elements should have a cumulative advantage over someone who is thriving in just one.
Models of thriving should consider conversion as a prerequisite to life in the fullness of God but also account for the eschatological tension that defines humanity's present reality and future hope.
The study, published in the journal European Psychologist , outlines a 'shopping list' of requirements for thriving in life.
From a teenager studying for their exams to an employee succeeding at work, thriving can be seen at all ages and across all cultures.
Overall, Panama was ranked as the happiest country in the world, with 61pc of the population adjudged to be thriving in "three or more elements of well-being".
Healthcare workers who are thriving in three or more well-being elements are more likely to report bouncing back quickly from illness, injury or hardship than those who are not.