three-vessel disease

three-vessel disease

Coronary heart disease in which three coronary arteries have significant narrowing/stenosis. Three-vessel diseases are more commonly managed by bypass than by stenting or angioplasty.
References in periodicals archive ?
The safety and effectiveness of the TAXUS Stents has not been established in patients with an acute myocardial infarction, or in patients with left main or three-vessel disease.
The safety and effectiveness of the TAXUS Express2 Stent System have not been established in patients with left main or three-vessel disease.
Multivariate regression analyses identified diastolic blood pressure, the presence of two-vessel and three-vessel disease by coronary angiography, as independent predictors of increased QTD, while identified prior coronary bypass surgery, the presence of two-vessel and three-vessel disease by coronary angiography, as independent predictors of increased QTcD (Table 2).
SYNTAX is considered a landmark study that will provide important data regarding the use of DES in these highly complex patients, including patients with three-vessel disease, left main coronary artery disease and patients with diabetes mellitus.
will present an analysis of two-year data from the SYNTAX trial assessing the effect of baseline renal insufficiency on outcomes in patients with left main and/or three-vessel disease who were revascularized with either PCI using a TAXUS Express Stent or CABG.
In the previous appropriate use document, PCI was deemed inappropriate for low burden left main disease and uncertain for low-burden three-vessel disease, they stated.
The safety and effectiveness of the TAXUS Express Stent has not been established in patients with left main or three-vessel disease.
The safety and effectiveness of the TAXUS(R) Express2(R) Paclitaxel-Eluting Coronary Stent System has not been established in patients with left main or three-vessel disease.
WENBIT involved 3,090 patients with established coronary heart disease, mostly stable angina and two- or three-vessel disease.
PCI patients were more likely to have one- or two-vessel disease, and bypass grafting most often was performed for two- or three-vessel disease.
The SYNTAX Score is breaking new ground by scientifically defining a measure for anatomical complexity that is intended to provide physicians with an important tool for assessing treatment options for high-risk patients with left main and three-vessel disease.
The study of nearly 1,700 patients, aged at least 80, found that although in-hospital mortality and short-term survival were better for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), survival from 6 months to 8 years was significantly higher among the patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting for either two- or three-vessel disease.