three-dimensional

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three-dimensional

, 3D
Of or pert. to three dimensions.

three-dimensional 

Pertaining to depth perception or the illusion of depth (e.g. a perspective drawing).
References in periodicals archive ?
If the definitions we have touched on are to be in any way relevant, then this discussion of labyrinths in the context of liminality will, of necessity, deal with aspects of area and space, thus returning us to the distinguishing criterion of two- and three-dimensionality.
In contrast to the traditional picture theory of vision, from which puzzles abound owing to the absence three-dimensional qualities in a flat, static image, Johansson has shown here that three-dimensionality appears as a primitive, fundamental quality inherent in the act of perceiving motions in stimulus configurations.
Flatness, the lack of three-dimensionality, is partly also due to the techno-economic recquirement for thinness, lightness and temporality; buildings are constructed merely as visual images, and their surfaces become ever thinner and more weightless.
The ability to apply these different degrees of sharpness permits the PT-AE3000 to reproduce natural, lifelike images with exceptional clarity and three-dimensionality to the smallest details.
He brings curiosity to bear on his investigation of the territory between two- and three-dimensionality.
Point out the yellow diamond pattern in the main, as well as the stone-like pattern of the coat, the shallow relief, and three-dimensionality of the form.
These bits of rubble are particularly diverting since the artist's foregrounding technique approximates the effect of three-dimensionality.
You need to get it from the source-yourself--and feel that three-dimensionality.
The Gallant Apparel: Italian Art and the Modern' (Robilant + Voena, 38 Dover St; +44 (0)20 7409 1540) explores a fascination with surface, texture and three-dimensionality apparent in the work of 20th-century Italian artists such as Piero Manzoni, Lucio Fontana and Paolo Scheggi.
Chemists begin with what the Heisenberg and Pauli principles, plus the three-dimensionality of space, tell us about stable electron configurations.
Key features of GEI's booth include interactivity, three-dimensionality, sensory stimulation, and contemporary aesthetics.
Throughout his work, these tensions erupt, not only through the subject matter, but also in the attendant loss and displacement evoked by the flat, ambiguous backgrounds which contrast noticeably with the three-dimensionality of the figurative painting.

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