threadworms


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threadworms

Intestinal parasitic worms which infect at least 20% of children at any one time. Enterobius vermicularis is a small, white worm about 1 cm long with a blunt head and a fine, hair-like, pointed tail. Eggs are laid on the skin around the child's anus and itching causes scratching and reinfection via the mouth. Threadworms can be removed with drugs such as mebendazole or piperazine, but all the members of the family must be treated. Also known as pinworms.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

threadworms

see NEMATODES.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It's grim, but the best way to check for threadworms is with a torch, in the dead of night Ear
Threadworms are between 2mm and 13mm long and have, as their name suggests, a "thread-like" appearance.
* Threadworms are prevalent throughout the tropical eastern hemisphere and are most commonly found in immigrants.
A sculptor takes her to Iceland to record and decorate her; red threadworms burrow in her crevices; her slow thoughts "rumble" in her stony mind.
The prevalence of cecal threadworms (Trichostrongylus tenuis) in red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scoticus).
PK, Sutton Coldfield A THREADWORMS, which are particularly common in children, often cause this problem and tend to affect the whole family, so if they're discovered, all of you must be treated.
Most Scottish Rock Ptarmigan have no cecal threadworms or other internal macroparasites; hence, these cannot cause ptarmigan cycles (Watson and Shaw 1991).
This night-bottom children making Threadworms, as the name suggests, look like small pieces of white thread.
Threadworms, also called pinworms, look like pieces of white thread in your poo and can also be seen around your child's bottom and can come out at night while your child is sleeping.
"Anything from infections (chickenpox, ringworm etc) and parasites (threadworms, bedbugs) to insect bites and allergic reactions (prickly heat, soaps, perfume or nickel), says Dr Perry.
The Pharmacist | skin conditions, such as mild acne and mild eczema | coughs and colds, including nasal congestion and sore throat | minor cuts and bruises | constipation and haemorrhoids (piles) | hay fever and allergies | aches and pains, such as headaches, earache and back pain | indigestion, diarrhoea and threadworms | period pain and thrush | warts and verrucas, mouth ulcers and cold sores | athlete's foot | nappy rash and teething GP or walk in centres | wound and dressing care | muscle and joint injuries, including strains and sprains | minor lacerations and cuts | infected wounds | If your problem is not urgent and has been present for a while, speak to your GP who will refer you to the right specialist for treatment.