threadworm


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Related to threadworm: Threadworm Infection

threadworm

 [thred´werm]
any long slender nematode, such as members of the genera Capillaria and Enterobius.

thread·worm

(thred'wŏrm),
Common name for species of the genus Strongyloides; sometimes applied to any of the smaller parasitic nematodes.

threadworm

/thread·worm/ (thred´werm) any long slender nematode, especially Enterobius vermicularis.

threadworm

(thrĕd′wûrm′)
n.

threadworm

See Enterobius vermicularis, Acanthocheilonema perstans.

threadworm

1. Pinworm, see there.
2. Strongyloides stercoralis.

thread·worm

(thred'wŏrm)
Common name for species of the genus Strongyloides; sometimes applied to any of the smaller parasitic nematodes.

Threadworm

Any long, thin nematode worm.
Mentioned in: Antihelminthic Drugs

threadworm

any nematode worm.

abdominal threadworm
setariaequina.
References in periodicals archive ?
Threadworms come from eggs, which are so small, they cannot be seen by the naked eye.
Two pupils who attend Christ the King Primary School were recently diagnosed with threadworm," he said.
A I completely understand your concern about threadworms but rest assured this is a very common problem, particularly in children.
Thin, white threadworms are the most common of the species to affect children in the UK.
Threadworm is a very common condition which results in itching.
The best way to see if your child has threadworms is to wait until they are asleep, part their butt cheeks and peer in with a torch.
Dog faeces may contain parvovirus, whipworms, hookworms, roundworms, threadworms, campylobacteriosis, giardia, and coccidia.
Doctors point out that contact with raw sewage leads to diseases such as cholera and hepatitis and, in children, it could lead to infection with hookworms and threadworms.
It is stored in all types of living organisms from threadworms and drosophila to mammals, and has been reported to regulate the proliferation, differentiation and motility of cells during early development and axis formation, organogenesis, and after birth.
Biofilm is formed by heterotrophic bacteria, fungi, protozoas, threadworms and crustaceans, pathogenic bacteria and even viruses e.
in children especially, but also in adults, threadworms can cause an itchy bottom.