thorn


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Thorn

(thorn),
George W., 20th-century U.S. physician. See: Thorn test, Thorn syndrome.

thorn

(thōrn),
In anatomy, a thornlike or spinous structure.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

thorn

a sharply pointed woody plant structure formed from a modified branch.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in classic literature ?
And when the Moon shone in the heavens the Nightingale flew to the Rose-tree, and set her breast against the thorn. All night long she sang with her breast against the thorn, and the cold crystal Moon leaned down and listened.
But the Tree cried to the Nightingale to press closer against the thorn. "Press closer, little Nightingale," cried the Tree, "or the Day will come before the rose is finished."
Now we stacked up the fire and went to sleep in our enclosure of thorns without fear, for we knew that the lions were far away eating game.
The feel of the long spear shaft in his hand and the sight of the tree beyond the lion gave the lad an idea--a preposterous idea--a ridiculous, forlorn hope of an idea; but there was no time now to weigh chances--there was but a single chance, and that was the thorn tree.
"Oh, oh, oh!" cried the boy as he struggled about among the thorns; "I say, come and help me out."
The command of the ship was intrusted to Jonathan Thorn, of New York, a lieutenant in the United States navy, on leave of absence.
There are lots of waste ground by the side of the roads in every village, amounting often to village greens, where feed the pigs and ganders of the people; and these roads are old-fashioned, homely roads, very dirty and badly made, and hardly endurable in winter, but still pleasant jog- trot roads running through the great pasture-lands, dotted here and there with little clumps of thorns, where the sleek kine are feeding, with no fence on either side of them, and a gate at the end of each field, which makes you get out of your gig (if you keep one), and gives you a chance of looking about you every quarter of a mile.
After many, many years there came a king's son into that land: and an old man told him the story of the thicket of thorns; and how a beautiful palace stood behind it, and how a wonderful princess, called Briar Rose, lay in it asleep, with all her court.
His eyelids closed, and his head sank on his shoulders, but the thorns ran into him and were so painful that he awoke at once.
But he had no hair at all, and all over his bald head and face and upon the backs of his hands grew sharp thorns like those found on the branches of rose-bushes.
And some fell among thorns, and the thorns sprung up and choked them."
That night two uncles and another brother stepped on poisoned thorns and died horribly.