thorax

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thorax

 [thor´aks]
the part of the body between the neck and abdomen; it is separated from the abdomen by the diaphragm. Its walls are formed by the 12 pairs of ribs, attached to the sides of the spine and curving toward the front. The principal organs in the thoracic cavity are the heart with its major blood vessels and the lungs with the bronchi, which bring in the body's air supply. The trachea enters the thorax to connect with the lungs, and the esophagus travels through it to connect with the stomach below the diaphragm. See also thoracic surgery. Called also chest and pectus.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tho·rax

, gen.

tho·ra·cis

, pl.

tho·ra·ces

(thō'raks, thō-rā'sis, -rā'sēz), [TA]
The upper part of the trunk between the neck and the abdomen; formed by the 12 thoracic vertebrae, the 12 pairs of ribs, the sternum, and the muscles and fasciae attached to these; below, it is separated from the abdomen by the diaphragm; it contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems.
[L. fr. G. thōrax, breastplate, the chest, fr. thōrēssō, to arm]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

thorax

(thôr′ăks′)
n. pl. thoraxes or thoraces (thôr′ə-sēz′)
1. The part of the human body between the neck and the diaphragm, partially encased by the ribs and containing the heart and lungs; the chest.
2. A part in other vertebrates that corresponds to the human thorax.
3. The second or middle region of the body of certain arthropods, including the insects and most crustaceans, lying between the head and the abdomen.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

thorax

The region between the neck and abdomen, which contains the heart, lungs (and the various veins, arteries, valves and tubules needed for their maintenance and functionality), thymus and oesophagus.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

tho·rax

, pl. thoraces (thō'raks, thō-rā'sēz) [TA]
The upper part of the trunk between the neck and the abdomen; it is formed by the 12 thoracic vertebrae, the 12 pairs of ribs, the sternum, and the muscles and fasciae attached to these; below, it is separated from the abdomen by the diaphragm; it contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems.
[L. fr. G. thōrax, breastplate, the chest, fr. thōrēssō, to arm]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

thorax

The part of the trunk between the neck and the ABDOMEN. The thorax contains a central compartment, the MEDIASTINUM that contains the heart and separates the two lungs. The thorax also contains the TRACHEA, the OESOPHAGUS, a number of large arteries and veins connected to the heart. Its walls consist of the dorsal VERTEBRA, the breastbone (sternum) and the rib cage.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

thorax

  1. (in vertebrates) that part of the body which contains the lungs and heart, and which in mammals is divided from the abdomen by the DIAPHRAGM.
  2. (in ARTHROPODS) that part of the body directly behind the head and in front of the abdomen which, in insects, consists of three segments bearing the legs and wings.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Thorax

The chest area, which runs between the abdomen and neck and is encased in the ribs.
Mentioned in: Chest X Ray
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

tho·rax

, pl. thoraces (thō'raks, thō-rā'sēz) [TA]
Upper part of trunk between neck and abdomen; formed by 12 thoracic vertebrae, 12 pairs of ribs, sternum, and muscles and fasciae attached to these.
[L. fr. G. thōrax, breastplate, the chest, fr. thōrēssō, to arm]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about thorax

Q. My mother had a chest pain and she was sent for a TEE. When do you need a TEE and when a normal echo is fine? My mother had a chest pain few weeks ago. we were sure its a heart attack and went to the ER. There the doctors did some tests and she was sent for a (trans thoracic echocardiogram) TEE. I want to know when do you need a TEE and when you can do just a normal echocardiogram because the TEE was very painful for her and we want to know if ther was a better way.

A. The main difference between TEE and normal echo is that in TEE u put the transducer directly in the esophagus. The transducer is the same and the idea is to put it as close as possible to the heart.
As far as I know there are some heart situations the TEE is better for diagnosis that normal echo. Maybe your mom had one of those situations?
I can recommend you to ask the ER doctor. he will probably be able to give a better explanation for his choice

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