thoracotomy

(redirected from thoracotomies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

thoracotomy

 [thor″ah-kot´ah-me]
incision of the chest wall; see also thoracic surgery. Called also pleuracotomy and pleurotomy.

tho·ra·cot·o·my

(thō'ră-kot'ŏ-mē),
Incision through the chest wall into the pleural space.
Synonym(s): pleurotomy
[thoraco- + G. tomē, incision]

thoracotomy

(thôr′ə-kŏt′ə-mē)
n. pl. thoracoto·mies
Surgical incision of the chest wall.

thoracotomy

Surgery An operation to open the chest and to directly access the mediastinum to visualize, biopsy, or treat Indications Lesions inaccessible by, or too large for, mediastinoscopy or mediastinotomy; open cardiac massage. See Mediastinoscopy, Mediastinotomy, Open lung biopsy.

tho·ra·cot·o·my

(thōr'ă-kot'ŏ-mē)
Incision into the chest wall.
Synonym(s): pleurotomy.
[thoraco- + G. tomē, incision]
Enlarge picture
THORACOTOMY SCAR

thoracotomy

(thō″răk-ŏt′ō-mē) [″ + tome, incision]
Surgical incision of the chest wall.
See: illustration

thoracotomy

A surgical opening in the chest wall made to gain access to the interior. Most thoracotomies are made between the ribs but access to the heart usually involves splitting the breastbone vertically and prizing the halves apart.

Thoracotomy

Open chest surgery.
Mentioned in: Thoracoscopy
References in periodicals archive ?
Matas' other resoundingly significant contribution to anesthesiology, the use of positive-pressure ventilation during thoracotomies. As a vascular surgeon, Dr.
75% of thoracotomies for penetrating cardiac injury survive.
A more recent study by Thomas et al (2002)8 reports results of 110 VATS procedures for lung cancer and compares their results with 405 standard thoracotomies. Their results indicate similar five-year survival for Stage IA and IB patients.
The surgical approach was orientated by imaging study findings using limited incision or postero-lateral thoracotomies; the latter were used for large or loculated empyemas.
Thoracotomies, especially through the left hemithorax, are particularly notable.
Supraclavicular approach and sometimes Thoracotomies are required for zone I injuries while Sternocleidomastoid approach with extension is required for zone II and zone III injuries.