third-party payer


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third-par·ty pay·er

(thĭrd-pahr'tē pā'ĕr)
An institution or company that provides reimbursement to health care providers for services rendered to a third party (i.e., the patient).
Synonym(s): third-party administrator.

third-party payer

An entity (other than the patient or the health care provider) that reimburses and manages health care expenses. Third-party payers include insurance companies, governmental agencies, and employers.

third-par·ty pay·er

(thĭrd-pahr'tē pā'ĕr)
An institution or company that provides reimbursement to health care providers for services rendered to a third party (i.e., the patient).
Synonym(s): third-party administrator.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dialogue with third-party payers would be encouraged.
The defendant drug companies' conspiracy to prevent the sale of the generic version of Cardizem CD denied consumers and third-party payers the opportunity to use a significantly less costly generic equivalent.
The practice of medicine is business, and third-party payers are part of the medical-industrial complex.
Third-party payers didn't contribute to implementation of guidelines through support systems and staff.
In every aspect of health care, trends point toward increasing use of data collection to satisfy the demands of third-party payers, the government and others wanting proof that a facility is meeting standards of quality.
Among the key variables are the program type (for example, transitional medical, general rehabilitation), specialized or general services, anticipated payer mix (both initially and over time), availability of professional staff in the labor market, unit size, and the expectations of third-party payers.
To that end, the following are the criteria that managed care, other third-party payers and potential referral sources will use to judge your infusion therapy program:
Independent physicians are responding to these changes by creating their own delivery systems that market their services to patients, health plans, and other third-party payers.
Although large third-party payers, notably NIedicare, Medicaid, and some of the larger Blue Cross/Blue Shield plans, did enjoy enough market power to exercise varying degrees of control over the prices of health services, the principle of free choice robbed all third-party payers of the leverage to manage the volume of services going into treating patients.