third heart sound


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Related to third heart sound: fourth heart sound

third heart sound (S3),

occurs in early diastole and corresponds with the end of the first phase of rapid ventricular filling; normal in children and younger people but abnormal in others.
Synonym(s): third sound
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

third heart sound

S3 gallop, ventricular gallop Cardiology An extra heart sound traditionally regarded as a sign of left ventricular systolic dysfunction–heart failure; its significance differs according to the valve involved and the type of underlying defect; it is caused by rapid ventricular filling, and best heard over the apex with the Pt in supine or left lateral position; it ↑ with inspiration, exercise, elevation of legs, ↑ venous return. Cf Fourth heart sound.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

third heart sound

(S3) (thĭrd hahrt sownd)
Occurs in early diastole and corresponds with the end of the first phase of rapid ventricular filling; normal in children and younger people but abnormal in others.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
If we included all clinical information available in the emergency department to the above logistic regression model (i.e., history of acute destabilized HF and the presence of orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, nocturnal cough, jugular venous distension, pulmonary rales, third heart sound, and peripheral edema), the diagnostic accuracy of the whole model was increased to 87%.
A harsh systolic murmur was heard in the aortic area with a third heart sound.
She hears a wide physiological splitting of the second heart sound, with a loud aortic component, but no third heart sound.
These results are consistent with the 1994 AHCPR clinical guidelines on LVSD.[1] These guidelines noted that the presence of elevated jugular venous pressure, a third heart sound, and laterally displaced apical impulse are "virtually diagnostic in patients with compatible symptoms," while the sensitivity and specificity of other clinical features have not proven sufficient to establish the diagnosis.
Physical findings in normal pregnancies may include jugular venous distension, an enlarged left ventricle apex, right ventricle heave, a palpable pulmonary artery pulse, third heart sounds, systolic ejection murmurs, venous hums, or a mammary souffle noise if you listen over the breast.

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