thin section

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thin sec·tion

, ultrathin section
a section of tissue for electron microscopic examination; the specimen is fixed, typically in glutaraldehyde and/or in osmium tetroxide, embedded in a plastic resin, and sectioned at less than 0.1 mcm in thickness with a glass or diamond knife in an ultramicrotome.

thin sec·tion

, ultrathin section (thin sek'shŭn, ŭl'tră-thin)
A section of tissue for electron microscopic examination; the specimen is fixed, typically in glutaraldehyde or osmium tetroxide, embedded in a plastic resin, and sectioned at less than 0.1 mcm in thickness with a glass or diamond knife in an ultramicrotome.
References in periodicals archive ?
The channels selected for analysis in thin sections were those containing either a decaying root or organic coatings on their surfaces (Fig.
They are relatively small and difficult to recognize in the thin sections.
These methods were: (1) reading the external rings on the shell; (2) counting the growth rings on thin sections of the hinge plate (chondrophore): and (3) counting growth rings of whole shell thin sections.
One thin section of each concentration was run on the EDXRF spectrometer and the Cu peak intensity noted, then another was placed on top of the first and the pair analyzed together.
For instance thin sections are not as energy efficient as thick ones.
This is the only data handbook on the barrier and film properties of polymeric materials in thin sections.
The completed thin sections were examined with a petrographic (polarizing) microscope for the purpose of identifying constituent sand-size (2 to 0.
Using drill core samples from the mine we made thin sections that could be studied for mineral content and analyzed for valuable information about the location of copper in the mine.
During the design process, CastView can be used to evaluate the possible locations of mold gates, vents, and overflow, and to determine where thick and thin sections could affect the quality of the finished casting.
Although low-cost carbon granules, not fibers, are used in most applications, no one has yet sliced granules into thin sections that would show the tiny pores, which are often only a few tenths of a nanometer wide, Mangun says.