thimerosal


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thimerosal

 [thi-mer´o-sal]
a mercury-containing compound used as a topical antifungal and antibacterial agent.

thi·mer·o·sal

(thī-mer'ō-săl),
Antiseptic used topically and as a preservative in vaccine preparations.

thimerosal

(thī-mĕr′ə-săl′)
n.
A cream-colored crystalline powder, C9H9HgNaO2S, used as a local antiseptic for abrasions and minor cuts.

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.

thi·mer·o·sal

(thī-mer'ŏ-săl)
Antiseptic used topically and as a preservative.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since insufficient information was available in the data set to directly calculate infant thimerosal exposure, the sample was split into two exposure groups: those born before 1990, as a surrogate for lower thimerosal exposure, and those born in 1990 and thereafter, as a surrogate for higher thimerosal exposure.
Similar to the effects of metals, thimerosal decreased MS activity in a dose-dependent manner, with OHCbl-based activity being more sensitive than MeCbl-based activity (Figure 5(a)), and this inhibition was associated with decreased GSH (Figure 4(e)) and decreased cysteine uptake (Figure 4(f)).
"That speaks to the hypothesis of thimerosal directly affecting behavior," she says.
In addition to transfer during pregnancy, some literature has alluded to potential detrimental effects of neonatal and early childhood vaccinations that contain thimerosal. In a study conducted by Mrozek-Budzyn, Majewska, Kieltyka, & Augustyniak (2012) the relationship between neonatal exposure to thimerosal and child development showed a potential adverse association.
Cells were grown in 96-well plates where 84 wells were inoculated with 270 [micro]L of 100,000 cells/mL in the presence of 0, 25, 50,100, 250, 500, and 1000 nM thimerosal. 10 [micro]L of thimerosal was added to each well as an ethanolic solution, some 60 minutes prior to inoculation, and the ethanol was allowed to evaporate.
Despite its known toxicology, Hg compounds (inorganic and organic) are still used in medicinal products all over the world: eastern traditional medicine (15), whitening and skin care products mainly in African countries (16) and as a preservative in immunogens in the form of thimerosal (12).
As with the seasonal flu vaccine, the H1N1 vaccine is produced in single-dose units, which do not contain thimerosal, and in multidose vials, which do contain a small amount of thimerosal to prevent contamination and bacterial growth.
Researchers point out that even though study after study has found no link between the vaccine stabilizer thimerosal and autism, thimerosal-free injectable versions of the flu vaccine are available for those who have lingering concerns.
"There is no evidence that thimerosal (which contains mercury) - used as a preservative in vaccine packaged in multi-dose vials - is harmful to a pregnant woman or a foetus.
There is no evidence that thimerosal poses a risk to the fetus.
The collection is a plea to the medical community to demand the release of clinical studies showing a link between the ever-increasing number of children suffering from autism and the amount of thimerosal, an ethylmercury preservative, they receive every time they are given an immunization.