thick skin


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thick skin

skin from the palms and soles, so named because of its relatively thick epidermis.
Body building Fat-rich smooth skin that covers muscle, which is undesirable for weight athletes who want others to appreciate their hard-earned bulk
Vox populi A popular term for emotional resiliency to insults and negativity
References in periodicals archive ?
Rough, ridged, or wrinkled skin can also be a sign of thick skin, pulpiness, and lack of juice.
Some writers have trouble with group situations and workshop situations and you have to have pretty thick skin to be there," says Chellas.
The young dancer must keep in mind that thick skin, knots, and non-painful corns or calluses are totally normal and part of the "toughening-up" process all dancers go through.
And the presenter reckons whoever takes the place of Dolores on the judging panel needs to have a thick skin.
The Swede said: "Sam has thick skin and can stand up to what's happening and resolve it.
BELLINGHAM are looking for a trainee club manager, who will need a thick skin.
I'm a big boy and I have a thick skin, but it's unfortunate that your family has to get dragged into it.
The main advantage will be improved quality, avoiding the need for southern European winter-grown tomatoes which often had a long shelf life or thick skin, he added.
I'm kicked around but that's my job - I've got a thick skin but I'm only a servant who is trying to get the money for the Welsh people.
Avoid: Rough, ridged, or wrinkled skin, which can be an indication of thick skin, pulpiness, and lack of juice.
WHEN one is in politics, one should have a thick skin.
A beautiful face and body, good skin, ambition, humility, charisma, confidence, a thick skin, being humble, a love for fashion, being able to walk, move and pose, plus a whole lot of sheer determination to succeed.