thiamine


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Related to thiamine: riboflavin, Thiamine deficiency

thiamine

 [thi´ah-min]
vitamin B1, a component of the B complex group of vitamins, found in various foodstuffs and present in the free state in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid. Deficiency results in neurological symptoms, cardiovascular dysfunction, edema, and reduced intestinal motility. See also vitamin.

thi·a·min

(thī'ă-min),
A heat-labile and water-soluble vitamin contained in milk, yeast, and in the germ and husk of grains; also artificially synthesized; essential for growth; a deficiency of thiamin is associated with beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.
[thia- + vitamin]

thiamine

(thī′ə-mĭn, -mēn′) also

thiamin

(-mĭn)
n.
A vitamin, C12H17ClN4OS, of the vitamin B complex, found in meat, yeast, and the bran coat of grains, and necessary for carbohydrate metabolism and normal neural activity. Also called vitamin B1.

thiamin

A water-soluble B vitamin that is a necessary cofactor in alpha-keto decarboxylation, links glycolysis with the Krebs cycle (tricarboxylic acid cycle, the main source of energy in mammals), and is critical in the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Thiamin aids in digestion; improves tolerance to pain; is useful against psoriasis, shingles and seborrhoeic dermatitis; and reduces gastric acidity. Absence of thiamin results in malnutrition, softened bones and mental depression.

Dietary sources
Grains, yeast and animal viscera.

thiamine

Vitamin B1. The drug is on the WHO official list. See also VITAMINS.

Thiamine

A B vitamin essential for the body to process carbohydrates and fats. Alcoholics may suffer complications (including Wernike-Korsakoff syndrome) from a deficiency of this vitamin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Critically ill patients are frequently deficient in thiamine, and in these patients the presence of thiamine deficiency is associated with an increased risk of death.
For the treatment of beriberi, doctors generally prescribe thiamine shots or pills.
Some cases of low thiamine levels may develop into ventroflexion , which causes the neck of a cat to bend towards the floor as well as mental dullness, blindness, wobbly walking, circling, falling, seizures, and sudden death.
Laboratory tests for plasma thiamine level are available but they are not reliable in all circumstances (8).
The recommended dietary allowance of thiamine increases with age and may be higher for obese patients.
We have been treating several patients affected by different neurodegenerative diseases, sporadic or genetic, with high-dose thiamine [12, 13].
In chronic alcoholics, there are multiple reasons of thiamine deficiency which are: Nutritional deficiency with a coexisting decrease in thiamine intake, repeated diarrhea, and vomiting.
One study in particular focused on patients with end-stage renal disease, who often have thiamine deficiencies.
Presupplementation thiamine level returned low at 55 nmol/L (normal range 70-180 nmol/L).
It can be due to various causes including thiamine deficiency.