thiamine


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Related to thiamine: riboflavin, Thiamine deficiency

thiamine

 [thi´ah-min]
vitamin B1, a component of the B complex group of vitamins, found in various foodstuffs and present in the free state in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid. Deficiency results in neurological symptoms, cardiovascular dysfunction, edema, and reduced intestinal motility. See also vitamin.

thi·a·min

(thī'ă-min),
A heat-labile and water-soluble vitamin contained in milk, yeast, and in the germ and husk of grains; also artificially synthesized; essential for growth; a deficiency of thiamin is associated with beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.
[thia- + vitamin]

thiamine

/thi·a·mine/ (thi´ah-min) vitamin B1; a water-soluble component of the B vitamin complex, found particularly in pork, organ meats, legumes, nuts, and whole grain or enriched breads and cereals. The active form is thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), which serves as a coenzyme in various reactions. Deficiency can result in beriberi and is a factor in alcoholic neuritis and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Written also thiamin.
thiamine pyrophosphate  (TPP) the active form of thiamine, serving as a coenzyme in a variety of reactions, particularly in carbohydrate metabolism.

thiamine

(thī′ə-mĭn, -mēn′) also

thiamin

(-mĭn)
n.
A vitamin, C12H17ClN4OS, of the vitamin B complex, found in meat, yeast, and the bran coat of grains, and necessary for carbohydrate metabolism and normal neural activity. Also called vitamin B1.

thiamine

[thī′əmin]
Etymology: Gk, theion, containing sulfur, amine, ammonia
a water-soluble, crystalline compound of the B vitamin complex, essential for normal metabolism and health of the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Thiamine plays a key role in the metabolic breakdown of glucose to yield energy in body tissues. Rich sources are pork; organ meats; green leafy vegetables; legumes; sweet corn; egg yolk; cornmeal; brown rice; yeast; and the germ and husks of grains, berries, and nuts. It is not stored in the body and must be supplied daily. A deficiency of thiamine affects chiefly the nervous system, the circulation, and the GI tract. Symptoms include irritability, emotional disturbances, loss of appetite, multiple neuritis, increased pulse rate, dyspnea, reduced intestinal motility, and heart irregularities. Severe deficiency causes beriberi. Also spelled thiamin. Also called antiberiberi factor, antineuritic vitamin, vitamin B1.

thiamin

A water-soluble B vitamin that is a necessary cofactor in alpha-keto decarboxylation, links glycolysis with the Krebs cycle (tricarboxylic acid cycle, the main source of energy in mammals), and is critical in the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Thiamin aids in digestion; improves tolerance to pain; is useful against psoriasis, shingles and seborrhoeic dermatitis; and reduces gastric acidity. Absence of thiamin results in malnutrition, softened bones and mental depression.

Dietary sources
Grains, yeast and animal viscera.

thiamine

Vitamin B1. The drug is on the WHO official list. See also VITAMINS.

Thiamine

A B vitamin essential for the body to process carbohydrates and fats. Alcoholics may suffer complications (including Wernike-Korsakoff syndrome) from a deficiency of this vitamin.

thiamine

vitamin B1; essential for normal growth; found in milk, yeast, grains

thiamine,

n See vitamin B1.

thiamin, thiamine

vitamin B1; a component of the B complex group of vitamins, found in various foodstuffs and present in the free state in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid. The pharmaceutical products are thiamin hydrochloride and thiamin pyrophosphate.

thiamin nutritional deficiency
an unlikely event in food animals with two exceptions: the secondary deficiency caused in horses and pigs by thiaminase in bracken and the primary deficiency in horses fed a diet almost entirely of turnips. In companion animals, the deficiency is much more common. Dogs, and particularly cats, fed diets in which thiamin has been destroyed, usually by excessive heat in processing but also by the inclusion of raw fish of certain marine species or sulfur dioxide as a food preservative, will develop signs of deficiency which include ataxia, mydriasis and convulsions.
References in periodicals archive ?
One can measure thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), the active form of thiamine, before initiating therapy.
There is insufficient evidence to suggest the use of blood thiamine levels in the diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy.
As I researched this subject further, I discovered an encouraging observational study that found 100 mg injections of thiamine reversed the symptoms of Parkinson's disease.
The patient was diagnosed with Wernicke's encephalopathy and was given thiamine infusion.
gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001379/) thiamine deficiency may include decreased appetite, salivation, vomiting and weight loss.
They said that the vitamin found in meat and grains could benefit most people with diabetes - both type 1 and type 2 - as between 70 to 90pct of people with diabetes are thiamine deficient.
Professor Thornalley and I are planning a foundation at the University of Warwick to further education and research in thiamine deficiency.
What are cobalmin, thiamine, pyridoxine and biotin types of?
1] family consists of thiamine, a pyrimidyl-substituted thiazole, and its phosphate esters: thiamine monophosphate (TMP), [3] thiamine diphosphate (TDP), and thiamine triphosphate.
However, numerous metabolomic approaches may contribute to alcohol-related research, as illustrated by studies on alcohol-related metabolic dysfunctions such as (1) alterations in fat metabolism and (2) thiamine deficiency.
Abstract: Thiamine deficiency can occur in any disease that results in inadequate intake or excessive loss of vitamin [B.