thiaminase


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thiaminase

 [thi-am´ĭ-nās]
an enzyme that catalyzes the splitting of thiamine into a pyrimidine and a thiazole derivative.

thi·am·i·nase

(thī-am'i-nās),
1. An enzyme present in raw fish that destroys thiamin and may produce thiamin deficiency in animals on a diet largely composed of raw fish.
2. A hydrolase cleaving thiamin into a pyrimidine moiety (that is, 2-methyl-4-amino-5-hydroxymethylpyrimidine) and a thiazole moiety (that is, 4-methyl-5-(2'-hydroxyethyl)thiazole); the pyrimidine moiety may appear in the urine as pyramin. Synonym(s): thiaminase II

thiaminase

[thī·am′inās]
an enzyme present in raw fish that destroys thiamine. A diet containing a substantial amount of raw fish could result in a thiamine deficiency because of the enzyme. A heat-stable form also exists.

thiaminase

an enzyme that catalyzes the splitting of thiamin into a pyrimidine and a thiazole derivative. Is present in some ferns, e.g. bracken, and in some species of fish so that diets containing these materials are likely to be deficient in thiamin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alewife are also high in the enzyme thiaminase, she says, which breaks down vitamin [B.
A diet rich in raw fish often has high levels of thiaminase.
Plants contain the enzyme thiaminase and if consumed in large quantities by livestock may cause poisonings (Dunbar 1989).
Thiaminase enzymes can cause PEM by destroying thiamin in the rumen.
Problems with the nervous system, such as a deficiency in thiamine (one of the B vitamins), which is not necessarily due to a dietary deficiency, but a problem with the enzyme thiaminase, that breaks down the vitamin so that it cannot be used by the body.
It may be caused by ingestion of feedstuffs containing thiaminases, the creation of a rumen environment encouraging the growth of thiaminase-producing bacteria, or excess sulfur intake.