thiamin deficiency

thiamin deficiency

A vitamin deficiency characterised by malnutrition, softened bones and mental depression, due to an absence of dietary thiamin. The clinical disease, beri-beri, is divided into a “wet” form, which causes congestive heart failure, and a “dry” form, which causes neurologic disease in the form of peripheral neuropathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

thiamin deficiency

Beri-beri Nutrition A vitamin deficiency characterized by malnutrition, softened bones, depression, due to an absence of dietary thiamin; the clinical disease is divided into 'wet' beri-beri, which causes CHF and 'dry' beri-beri, which causes neurologic disease in the form of peripheral neuropathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. See Thiamin.

thiamin deficiency (thīˑ··min d·fiˑ·shn·sē),

n insufficient levels of thiamin in the body to support functioning, which causes beriberi.
References in periodicals archive ?
The prevalence of thiamin deficiency in hospitalized patients with congestive heart failure.
Thiamin deficiency can occur in people taking strong diuretics (known as loop diuretics) for congestive heart failure, and this deficiency itself can adversely affect heart function.
Chronic high intakes of alcohol predispose to thiamin deficiency in several ways:
Fortification with thiamin is a public health strategy which addresses Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), a result of thiamin deficiency.
Cobalt depresses oxygen uptake by the mitochondria of the heart and interferes with energy metabolism in a manner similar to the effects of thiamin deficiency, which explained the pathophysiology of cardiomyopathy in these patients.
Discrepancies between the ETK activation test and clinical signs of thiamin deficiency have been reported previously, with several studies reporting no relationship between ETK activation results and thiamin intake (1-5).
Meanwhile, our experience with the HPLC assay suggests that measurement of TDP in red cells is the single most useful biochemical measurement for assessing thiamin status in patients who are at risk of thiamin deficiency.
Thiamin deficiency once killed thousands and perhaps millions of people in different countries across the world and particularly in Asia.
Thiamin deficiency still has the potential to be lethal to each one of us, because it is an essential nutrient.
The most widely used method to detect thiamin deficiency is the indirect measurement of TDP in erythrocytes with either the transketolase activation test or the transketolase activity assay (5,6), but these tests are functional rather than a direct measurement of thiamin status and therefore may be influenced by factors other than thiamin deficiency.
The Insight article by Roem presents a case study of severe hyperemesis gravidarum and consequent thiamin deficiency.
Marginal thiamin deficiency was subsequently diagnosed and she was treated with 100 mg intramuscular thiamin and discharged on 100 mg oral thiamin daily.