thiamin


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Related to thiamin: riboflavin, folate

thiamine

 [thi´ah-min]
vitamin B1, a component of the B complex group of vitamins, found in various foodstuffs and present in the free state in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid. Deficiency results in neurological symptoms, cardiovascular dysfunction, edema, and reduced intestinal motility. See also vitamin.

thi·a·min

(thī'ă-min),
A heat-labile and water-soluble vitamin contained in milk, yeast, and in the germ and husk of grains; also artificially synthesized; essential for growth; a deficiency of thiamin is associated with beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.
[thia- + vitamin]

thiamin

See thiamine.

thiamin

A water-soluble B vitamin that is a necessary cofactor in alpha-keto decarboxylation, links glycolysis with the Krebs cycle (tricarboxylic acid cycle, the main source of energy in mammals), and is critical in the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Thiamin aids in digestion; improves tolerance to pain; is useful against psoriasis, shingles and seborrhoeic dermatitis; and reduces gastric acidity. Absence of thiamin results in malnutrition, softened bones and mental depression.

Dietary sources
Grains, yeast and animal viscera.

megavitamin therapy

The administration of excess or 'hyper-doses' of water-soluble vitamins, either physician-guided–eg, to treat neuropathies, or self-prescribed by health-food advocates. See Decavitamin, Orthomolecular medicine, Vitamin.
Megavitamins, adverse effects  
Thiamin CNS hyperresponsiveness–convulsions, Parkinson's disease–thiamin antagonizes l-dopa, sensory neuropathy–destruction of dorsal axon roots
Niacin/nicotinic acid & niacinamide/nicotinamide Exacerbation of asthma–histamine release, cardiac disease–arrhythmias, GI symptoms, eg nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, DM–hyperglycemia, gout–↑ uric acid, liver disease–enzyme leakage, hepatocellular injury, portal fibrosis or massive necrosis, cholestatic jaundice, peptic ulcer disease–histamine release, ↑ acidity, skin disease
Vitamin B6 Paresthesia, headaches, asthenia, irritability
Vitamin C ↑ Iron absorption, possibly iron overload, evoking diarrhea, renal calculus formation and possibly inhibiting the bacteriolytic activity of neutrophils, G6PD deficiency–↑ red cell lysis, megaloblastic anemia–↓ vitamin B12 absorption, nephrolithiasis–oxaluria Diagn Clin Testing 1990; 28:27  

thi·a·min

(thī'ă-min)
A heat-labile and water-soluble vitamin contained in milk, yeast, and the germ and husk of grains; also artificially synthesized; essential for growth; a deficiency of thiamin is associated with beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.
Synonym(s): vitamin B1.
[thia- + vitamin]

thi·a·min

(thī'ă-min)
Heat-labile and water-soluble vitamin contained in milk, yeast, and in the germ and husk of grains; essential for growth. Sometimes spelled thiamine.
Synonym(s): vitamin B1.
[thia- + vitamin]

thiamin, thiamine

vitamin B1; a component of the B complex group of vitamins, found in various foodstuffs and present in the free state in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid. The pharmaceutical products are thiamin hydrochloride and thiamin pyrophosphate.

thiamin nutritional deficiency
an unlikely event in food animals with two exceptions: the secondary deficiency caused in horses and pigs by thiaminase in bracken and the primary deficiency in horses fed a diet almost entirely of turnips. In companion animals, the deficiency is much more common. Dogs, and particularly cats, fed diets in which thiamin has been destroyed, usually by excessive heat in processing but also by the inclusion of raw fish of certain marine species or sulfur dioxide as a food preservative, will develop signs of deficiency which include ataxia, mydriasis and convulsions.
References in periodicals archive ?
INGREDIENTS: Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour (Bleached Flour, Malted Barley Flour, Niacin, Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Vegetable Oil (contains one or more of the following oils: Cottonseed Oil, Palm Oil, Soybean Oil), Dextrose, Water, Sugar, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Food Starch--Modified (Corn and/or Wheat), Contains 2% or Less of the Following: Eggs, Nonfat Milk, Glycerin, Soy Flour, Corn Syrup Solids, Leavening (Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate, Baking Soda, Sodium Aluminum Phosphate), Preservatives (Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Propionate, Calcium Propionate), Salt, Natural and Artificial Flavor, Mono--and Diglycerides, Soy Lecithin, Spices, Tapioca Starch, Wheat Starch, Artificial Color, Cellulose Gum, Guar Gum, Karaya Gum, colored with extracts of Annatto and Turmeric.
Thiamin is usually supplemented in the form of thiamin mononitrate, which is 91.
Beriberi, the disease caused from not getting enough thiamin (vitamin [B.
The ads, which display healthy bodies bathed in milk, show consumers that in addition to Calcium, milk contains energy, Niacin, Riboflavin, Folic Acid, Magnesium, Protein, Carbohydrates, Phosphorus, Thiamin, Pantothenate, Zinc and vitamins D, A, B6 and B12.
Alcohol interferes with the body's ability to metabolize thiamin, and alcoholic individuals tend to have poor diets, further reducing their thiamin intake.
It is also a rich natural source of vitamin B, iron manganese, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, calcium, phosphorous and carbohydrate.
One egg provides six grams of very high quality protein as well as vitamins A, B12, D, folate, thiamin, riboflavin, phosphorus, carotenoids, and zinc.
1) promotes the measurement of thiamin diphosphate (TDP) for the assessment of vitamin [B.
The water-soluble vitamins are B-complex vitamins - thiamin (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), niacin (vitamin B3), pyridoxine (vitamin B6), folic acid, vitamin B12, biotin, pantothenic acid and vitamin C.
Many men fall short of the minimum daily values for vitamins A, B6, C, E, thiamin, riboflavin, folic acid, calcium and magnesium.
All patients receiving oral vitamin preparations must receive intravenous thiamin.