thesis

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the·sis

, pl.

the·ses

(thē'sis, -sēz),
1. Any theory or hypothesis advanced as a basis for discussion.
2. A proposition submitted by the candidate for a doctoral degree in some universities, which must be sustained by argument against any objections offered.
3. An essay on a medical topic prepared by the graduating student.
[G. a placing, a position, thesis]
References in classic literature ?
She was already thirty-six when in 1856 she entered on creative authorship with the three 'Scenes from Clerical Life.' The pseudonym which she adopted for these and her later stories originated in no more substantial reason than her fondness for 'Eliot' and the fact that Mr.
"The opinion of a swordsman can have very little weight," replied D'Artagnan, who began to be uneasy at the turn things were taking, "and you had better be satisfied, believe me, with the knowledge of these gentlemen."
Now, I have confessed to these learned ecclesiastics, and that in all humility, that the duties of mounting guard and the service of the king have caused me to neglect study a little.
My misfortunes began with the illness and death of Pokrovski, who was taken worse two months after what I have last recorded in these memoirs.
At the time I could not understand these reproaches, and it was not until long afterwards that I learned--or rather, I guessed--why eventually my mother declared that she could not go on living with Anna.
Because a true and natural man contains and is the same truth which an eloquent man articulates; but in the eloquent man, because he can articulate it, it seems something the less to reside, and he turns to these silent beautiful with the more inclination and respect.
Or are these sophistries to be regarded as belonging to the age in which he lived and to his personal character, and this apparent haughtiness as flowing from the natural elevation of his position?
It may be observed that these sophisms all occur in his cross-examination of Meletus, who is easily foiled and mastered in the hands of the great dialectician.
I wish in these lectures to analyse as fully as I can what it is that really takes place when we, e.g.
But the question of mind is more difficult, and it is this question that I propose to discuss in these lectures.
Very few perhaps are familiar with these lines--yet no less a poet than Shelley is their author.
He must be theory-mad beyond redemption who, in spite of these differences, shall still persist in attempting to reconcile the obstinate oils and waters of Poetry and Truth.