thermoregulate


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Related to thermoregulate: Thermal regulation

thermoregulate

(thûr′mō-rĕg′yə-lāt′)
intr.v. thermoregu·lated, thermoregu·lating, thermoregu·lates
1. To regulate body temperature.
2. To undergo thermoregulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
In summary, ectothermic organisms living at high altitudes overcome the limitations of their environments, such as hypoxia, with structural modifications that allow them to not only exchange gases more easily but also to thermoregulate more efficiently in low temperature environments.
Other species of coastal elasmobranchs have shown similar movements between different temperatures to behaviorally thermoregulate (Hight and Lowe 2007; Farrugia et al.
The timing and prevalence of sunbathing by burrowing owls suggests they may have done so to shed ectoparasites rather than to thermoregulate or dry wet feathers based on three lines of evidence.
The only way dogs have to thermoregulate their bodies is panting, which is air flow over the respiratory system.
Although men and women thermoregulate internal temperature in a similar manner, key sex differences exist in how they respond to heat.
For instance, if wind on the East Front affects Mule Deer habitat use, we predicted Mule Deer will use exposed sites over sheltered sites because of shallower snow depths; however, during periods of high winds that decrease their ability to thermoregulate (Mautz 1978), Mule Deer would then seek unexposed aspects.
Like many large decapod crustaceans, American lobsters are highly mobile and thermoregulate behaviorally by moving into areas with water temperatures they find preferable and away from areas with temperatures they find aversive (Reynolds and Casterlin, 1979; Crossin et al, 1998; Jury and Watson, 2000, 2013).
Many processes that lead to death are associated with the reduced ability of marine mammals to thermoregulate (Dierauf and Gulland, 2001; Rosen et al.
Incubation, the use of parental body heat to thermoregulate eggs (Blanken and Nol 1998) is essential for the growth and development of avian embryos (Purdue 1976; Clutton-Brock 1991; Tieleman et al.
This estimates the individual's investment to thermoregulate and maintain an appropriate body temperature and does not reflect environmental temperatures.
The differences are in the facts that humans and horses regulate their body temperature during strenuous exercise by sweating, whereas dogs thermoregulate by panting, and that the duration of exercise is far shorter in greyhounds.
Severe overheating damages the dog's ability to thermoregulate and can lead to hypothermia if cooled too fast or with too much cold.