thermoreceptor


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thermoreceptor

 [ther″mo-re-sep´tor]
a nerve ending sensitive to stimulation by heat.

ther·mo·re·cep·tor

(ther'mō-rē-sep'tŏr, -tōr),
A receptor that is sensitive to heat.

thermoreceptor

(thûr′mō-rĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
A sensory receptor that responds to heat and cold.

ther·mo·re·cep·tor

(thĕr'mō-rĕ-sep'tŏr)
A receptor that is sensitive to heat.

thermoreceptor

A sensory receptor that responds to heat.

thermoreceptor

a sensory nerve ending which is responsive to temperature change.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The somatic nervous system collects sensory data from skin thermoreceptors as well as from the internal organs through the blood stream, evaluates this data, and yields a thermal comfort response after processing the data based on the psychological state.
Such modality interconversions are reasonable because chemoreceptors and thermoreceptors in nematodes utilize the same classes of intracellular signaling molecules and transcription factors as animal photoreceptors (Svendsen and McGhee, 1995; Coburn and Bargmann, 1996; Mori, 1999; Troemel, 1999; Komatsu et al., 1999; Satterlee et al., 2001; Arendt, 2003; Kimura et al., 2004; Inada et al., 2006).
Toftum and Nielsen (1996) explained this relationship such that when the deep body temperature is raised due to the increased physical activity, the influence of the impulses from thermoreceptors on the thermoregulation is decreased to maintain the heat balance.
Early detection of ulceration is complicated because diabetes causes a loss of connection between the muscle and the nerves (sensory denervation) and affects thermoreceptors and mechanoreceptors by depriving the patient from feeling any symptom, such as pain or swelling, when some injury has occurred [9, 12].
Patients may state they are warmer than they actually are as the thermoreceptors aren't functioning correctly, and we monitor their temperature less frequently as we think they can tell us when they feel cold (Sessler & Kurtz, 2008).
The hsI may function in forming a small plastron-like air bubble associated with the club; th may function as hygro- and thermoreceptors when the RWW is out of water (Hix et al.
Unpleasant perceptions of effort during exercise can therefore arise from various chemoreceptors, ergoreceptors and thermoreceptors in the body, but the perceptions most relevant to catastrophic neuronal dysfunction are probably oppressive feelings of heat and breathlessness, which build until they become imperatives to reduce exercise intensity.
These control centres receive nerve impulses from thermoreceptors in the skin and the hypothalamus (Tortora & Grabowski 2003).