thermoluminescent dosimeter

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ther·mo·lu·mi·nes·cent do·sim·e·ter

(TLD) (thĕr'mō-lū-mi-nes'ĕnt dō-sim'ĕ-tĕr)
Device resembling a film badge but that uses lithium fluoride crystals instead of film to record radiation exposure.
See also: film badge

thermoluminescent dosimeter

(thĕr″mō-loo-mĭ-nĕs′ĕnt)
A monitoring device consisting of a small crystal in a container that can be attached to a patient or to a health care worker. It stores energy when struck by ionizing radiation. When heated, it will emit light proportional to the amount of radiation to which it has been exposed.
References in periodicals archive ?
A 0.3-cm diameter and 0.8-cm height of cylinder was contoured at the lumen of the choana and defined as the PTV since a thermoluminescent dosimetry chip (TLD) (University of Wisconsin-Madison Radiation Calibration Laboratory, Madison, WI, USA) was placed in this region.
Thermoluminescent Dosimetry. University of Wisconsin Press, Madison.
Film dosimeters are known to be notoriously susceptible to various environmental effects such as temperature and humidity, and since the data show some extreme variations that are unexplained, the decision to replace film with thermoluminescent dosimetry for perimeter monitoring was not difficult.
Various measurement schemes were developed using film dosimetry, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) and specially designed ionization chambers.[11] In 1981, the Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH), now the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), introduced a significant step toward CT dose measurement that was not only accurate but also easy to perform compared with earlier measurement techniques.