thermocline

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thermocline

a boundary layer, found in lakes or enclosed seas, between warm upper water and cooler lower water, that is usually maintained only under calm conditions in summer.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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That's important when you're fishing over a thermocline in the summer.
The thermocline will hold it up at the 12-16 foot depth range.
The three lakes did not thermally stratify during 2005, but did display weak thermocline development in 2011 and 2012 and strongly stratified during 1989, 1991, 1996, and 2001 (Figure 5).
On his home waters along Alabama and Coosa river impoundments, Dannenmueller, co-owner of Crappie NOW magazine, says the key to locating summer crappies is to identify the depth of the thermocline, or where stratification creates an oxygen barrier to fish.
Out at midlake, Scissor Head patrols the upper limit of the thermocline. Up above, a line digs into the water, following the demand of a big-billed crankbait.
"Poor river plumes have matures lolling around during late summer above deep thermoclines, refusing to stage in the warmer water near shore," Oravec says.
Thermoclines also play an important part in finding bass this time of the year.
Thermoclines develop where layers of water maintain a certain temperature.
"The bottom line on all southern lakes like Eufaula, Oklahoma, or Truman in Missouri," he says, "is this: Once the water reaches its warmest point, thermoclines develop, pushing crappies shallow.
Ideal water temp for these fish is around 72 degrees, and some thermoclines offshore will have this prime comfort zone.
Another advantage is finding thermoclines. When lakes stratify during the summer, there is insufficient oxygen below the thermocline to support fish, so there is no point in fishing below that.
From an educated fisherman's point of view, the ocean is a kind of watery desert, pierced by streams of life in the form of current edges and thermoclines. Out there, drifting debris, with shade and recesses for small life to hide in, becomes like an oasis.