thermic effect of food


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thermic effect of food

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TEF

The increase in the body's metabolic rate that is produced by the consumption, digestion, metabolism, and storage of food. Foods with relatively low thermic effects include most carbohydrates, since carbohydrates, esp. sugars, cost the body relatively little energy to digest and metabolize. Protein-rich meals have a higher TEF, which is the rationale for low-carbohydrate diets, such as the Atkins and South Beach diets. Synonym: specific dynamic action of food.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Seals, "Thermic effect of food and [beta]-adrenergic thermogenic responsiveness in habitually exercising and sedentary healthy adult humans," Journal of Applied Physiology, vol.
This observation could be mediated by a reduced sympathetic nervous activity [34], reduced thermic effect of food [35], or a reduction in resting metabolic rate associated with a reduced body weight.
UCLA dietitian Dana Ellis, RD, explains that proteins have a higher thermic effect of food (TEF) than carbohydrates, meaning that the body requires more energy to process protein than carbohydrates.
Kang (College of New Jersey) describes energy metabolism during physical activities and sports, exercise strategies for enhancing energy utilization, cellular adaptations to aerobic training, altered energy metabolism due to diabetes and obesity, and the thermic effect of food. The early chapter on regulation of energy metabolism discusses pancreatic and adrenal hormones, but not the thyroid.