thermal artifact

thermal artifact

distortion of microscopic structure in a tissue specimen, because of heat generated by the instrument (for example, loop electrocautery) used to obtain the specimen.

ther·mal ar·ti·fact

(thĕr'măl ahr'ti-fakt)
Distortion of microscopic structure in a tissue specimen, because of heat generated by the instrument (e.g., loop electrocautery) used to obtain the specimen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Histologic thermal artifact was reported for 19 specimens, of which the thermal injury was reported to obscure the interpretation for 1 1.
The presence of thermal artifact that interfered with interpretation in 5.
Resected tissue was sent for pathological review and a pathologist blinded to the treatment assignment reviewed all tissue and provided grading on the degree of thermal artifact based in the percentage of affected tissue (Grade I: 0%, Grade II: <25%, Grade III: 25% to 50%, Grade IV: 50% to 75% and Grade V: >75%).
On histological examination of the surgical specimen there was no difference in the amount of thermal artifact (charring) observed in the resected tissue.
Age, parity, marital status, lesion severity, loop size used, number of specimens, amount of bleeding, method of hemostasis, and thermal artifact were included in the analysis.
Quantitative electrical specification and histologic thermal artifact measurements and qualitative observations were recorded for 13 electrosurgical units representing II manufacturers.
Thermal artifacts in bladder tumours following loop endoresection: Electrovaporization vs.
But shooting a dark frame separately that was the same length as the light frame, then subtracting it later in processing, did a better job of cleaning up most thermal artifacts.
False variation in readings can be caused by thermal artifacts that result from air drafts, patient positioning or movement, medical treatments, variation in haired or feathered areas, or other exogenous causes of warm and cool zones.
The thermal artifacts are removed using conventional machining.
This creates thermal artifacts that build up in your photo, which appear like static or noise in photos exposed longer than a few seconds.
Cooling can reduce thermal artifacts, but it cannot eliminate them altogether.