therapeutic intent

therapeutic intent

NIHspeak A specific endpoint sought in a line of therapeutic research–eg, prolongation of life, shrinkage of tumor, or improved quality of life, even in absence of cure or dramatic improvement of a condition
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The study was designed so that the 24 participants and the researchers did not know who trained with the audiogame programmed for therapeutic benefit and who trained with a 'placebo' game without therapeutic intent.
Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), [2] the quantitative determination of compounds administered with therapeutic intent, is one way personalized medicine is practiced.
Schatman said it might be reasonable to question the therapeutic intent when products feature THC content at levels this high.
Live Organisms--Like endogenous compounds, clinical studies involving live organisms also require an IND because, even if there is not a therapeutic intent or use, there is an intent to affect the structure or function of the body.
It also assesses the evidence for the therapeutic intent of each drug.
Particularly in the 1970s and 1980s, there were a number of case reports and small literature reviews indicating that hepatic injury among regular users of alcohol (particularly chronic alcoholics) who take acetaminophen with therapeutic intent could be a "therapeutic misadventure.
The term itself, 'CAM Products,' connotes a medicinal or therapeutic intent with respect to any foods, dietary supplements, cosmetics or other products used in CAM practice.
The problem with a purely intention-based distinction between research on human subjects and patient-centered therapy is, as Nancy King has noted, that therapeutic intent tends to overwhelm other considerations (N.
The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the NCI contend that even in Phase I trials, where there may be minimal clinical evidence of effectiveness, there must be some therapeutic intent to justify toxic therapy.
Of course a clinician like Lewis Sayre, who performed surgical experiments of therapeutic intent and tracked the results as best he could, would have strenuously argued that his work was every bit as scientific as researchers lik Paul Ehrlich, who worked in laboratories in search of verifiable truths.
In modern medical terms a placebo has come to mean '"the psychological, physiological or psychophysiological effect of any medication or procedure given with therapeutic intent, which is independent of, or minimally related to, the pharmacological effects of the medication or to the specific effects of the procedure, and which operates through a psychological mechanism.
Others are willing to call treatments "experimental" where the physician's therapeutic intent is clear but his skill, his judgment, the quality of his disclosure, or the success or safety of the experimental alternative is in question.

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