gravitation

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grav·i·ta·tion

(grav'i-tā'shŭn),
The force of attraction between any two bodies in the universe, varying directly as the product of their masses and inversely as the square of the distance between their centers; expressed as F = Gm1m2l -2, where G (newtonian constant of gravitation) = 6.67259 × 10-11 m3 kg-1 s-2, m1 and m2 are the masses (in kg) of the two bodies, and l is the distance separating them in meters.
[L. gravitas, weight]

gravitation

(grăv″ĭ-tā′shŭn) [L. gravitas, weight]
The force and movement tending to draw every particle of matter together, esp. the attraction of the earth for bodies at a distance from its center.
References in periodicals archive ?
3-vector Vgv in the left side of (21) is equivalent in its meaning to action of Christoffel symbols, which are used to write the equations of motion in Riemannian space in four-dimensional notation, both in the general theory of relativity and in the covariant theory of gravitation.
Together, they worked on the Unified Field Theory of Gravitation and Electromagnetism.
If so, dark energy would resemble the cosmological constant, which Albert Einstein conceived shortly after he developed his theory of gravitation more than 90 years ago.
No theory of gravitation with any significant support requires that matter repel antimatter, and general relativity (the topic of the book, after all) explicitly predicts that antimatter is attracted by mass just as ordinary matter is.
In this paper, a new and most probable explanation for the SNela measurements is developed without attempting to modify the theory of gravitation or the model of cosmology by inserting one or more fields or constants into GR or FE.
In the early 1950s, Ghaffari worked with Albert Einstein at Princeton University's Institute of Advanced Study on the Unified Field Theory of Gravitation and Electromagnetism.
Surrounding the shadow should be a bright ring, arising from light that barely escapes the black hole's clutches and is bent by the monster's gravity, as predicted by Einstein's theory of gravitation.
In this article, we establish a link between Schwarzschild's metric and Newton's dynamical theory of gravitation.
According to Einstein's theory of gravitation, the white dwarfs are spiraling toward each other because they're losing energy in the form of gravitational waves-invisible ripples in space-time that cause objects with mass to bob up and down.
Together, these numbers describe the past, present, and future of any possible homogeneous, isotropic universe where general relativity is the right theory of gravitation.
Consequently, the theory of gravitation is a continuation of quantum theory (Problem 1 and Problem 3).
Among these were the infrared Spitzer Space Telescope and Gravity Probe B, a mission to test Albert Einstein's theory of gravitation.