theory of aging


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theory of aging

Any coherent set of concepts that explains the aging process at the cellular, biological, psychological, and sociological levels.
See also: theory
References in periodicals archive ?
This telomere theory of aging conceived by Olovnikov (1973) and Harley (1995) is supported by numerous studies in vitro and in vivo (Harley et al.
In fact, there is a well-known and accepted theory of aging the mitochondrial theory of aging which alludes to these facts, and asserts that the very process of aging itself is simply the end result of mitochondrial decay.
The general "wear-and-tear" theory of aging suggests that constant damage to mitochondrial DNA over a period of time without sufficient genetically-controlled repair mechanisms simply wears the individual out.
Vladimir Dilman, the founder of neuroendocrine theory of aging, and Prof.
Regarded as the "Father of the Inflammation Theory of Aging," Dr.
Denham Harman to acquire 35 chemistry patents, propound today's best-known theory of aging (some say his free-radical hypothesis deserves a Nobel Prize), and offer a theory and cure for Alzheimer's disease that most scientists today are inexplicably ignoring.
This idea is at the heart of the evolutionary theory of aging.
The free-radical theory of aging is based on the hypothesis that the endogenous build-up of free-radical species results in oxidative molecular damage.
The free radical theory of aging is backed by more than seven decades of research on calorie restriction.
This theory of aging was called by Kirkwood the disposable soma--a name which derives from the fact that the individual's reproductive output and not the physical body is the basis of the target function of natural selection.
1) As a new theory of aging it has gained some influence in professional fields, especially in Scandinavian gerontology, and we believe it is high time to subject it to a critical review.

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